Bakersfield

Once green, Beach Park turns brown as well that supplies irrigation water stops pumping | News – Bakersfield, California

Bakersfield, California 2021-07-20 21:30:00 –

At Beach Park, one of Bakersfield’s most prominent parks, the grass fades from green to golden to dull brown.

This means that there is no lawn on soccer fields, baseball fields, or elsewhere in the 26-acre park on 24th Avenue and Oak Street.

“It’s frustrating to see the lawn wither and the park in that state,” said Andre Gonzales, Bakersfield city council member.

Wells that supply irrigation water to the park have been shut down for several weeks since late May or early June, according to city spokesman Joseph Conroy.

“We hope to get it back in the next few weeks,” Conroy said in an email.

An employee of Recreation & Parks realized that the system’s irrigation pumps needed repair. The city is working with a local well contractor to repair the equipment and is waiting for the parts needed to complete the repair.

However, there is a delay in obtaining these parts.

“The pandemic disrupts the supply chain of all industries and impacts the availability of parts and materials needed for such repairs,” said Conroy.

“To prevent the loss of as many plants as possible, especially the mature trees throughout the park, the city has used water trucks to provide some of the water it needs,” he said.

Indeed, the green grass that remains in the park is under the trees.

According to Gonzales, city officials deserve praise for their foresight to protect the trees in the park by devoting themselves to watering by hand. But his frustration was obvious.

“Beach parks are one of the most visible parks in the community,” said the councilor. “Every week tens of thousands of people pass by the park.

“It’s like our second Central Park,” he said. “It stands out very much”

According to Gonzales, park staff believe the lawn will return when the water is turned on again.

However, he believes this problem has occurred before and wants a more permanent solution.

“Why can’t the park be connected to the city’s water supply?” He said.

Gonzales said the purple pipe could also be part of the solution. Purple pipe means using reclaimed or recycled water to convert wastewater into water that can be reused for other purposes, especially for irrigation.

“We are in a drought,” he said. “And there will be more drought in the future.”

Reporter Stephen Mayer can be reached at 661-395-7353. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter: @semayerTBC.

Once green, Beach Park turns brown as well that supplies irrigation water stops pumping | News Source link Once green, Beach Park turns brown as well that supplies irrigation water stops pumping | News

Back to top button