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Pelosi’s Taiwan visit made things worse: ex-Singapore diplomat

There are “more intelligent ways” to support Taiwan is better than Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi Bilahari Kaushikan, former undersecretary of Singapore’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, told CNBC that he had visited the island.

The move could undermine efforts by the United States and others to help Taiwan in the future. further complicating Taiwan’s political relations with Chinahe told CNBC’s “Street Signs Asia” on Friday.

“I think Taiwan needs and deserves help, but has this achieved anything worthwhile? I don’t think so. rice field.

Ignoring weeks of warnings from Beijing, Pelosi visited Taiwan and met with President Tsai Ing-wen on Wednesday. Taiwan is an autonomous democracy, but Beijing views the island as an independent province and claims it has no right to diplomatic relations.

Pelosi’s visit made her the highest-ranking U.S. official to visit Taiwan in 25 years.

China begins military exercises The next day, in the airspace and waters around Taiwan. On Friday, Beijing announced sanctions against Pelosi and her next of kin, but did not specify what those sanctions would be.

US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-California) poses for a photo with Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen at the Presidential Office Building in Taipei, Taiwan August 3, 2022.

Handout | Getty Images

“What Taiwan needs is a certain ability…What Taiwan needs is diplomatic support.What Taiwan doesn’t need is a visit. It may discourage other countries from visiting Taiwan.It’s a strong response from China,” Kaushikan said.

Whether the visit was good or bad for Taiwan is “at least an open question,” he said. “There are many other smarter, less risky ways to give Taiwan the support it needs and deserves.”

Kaushikan said the visit could upend the status quo in the region, prompting China’s “half-hysterical” reaction and “giving China an excuse” to launch missiles near Taiwan.

Relations between the two countries are becoming increasingly hot and difficult. Just remove the match and light the flame and it will light more or less.

Kevin Rudd

Former Prime Minister of Australia

Still, the former diplomat argued that conflict between China and Taiwan was unlikely.

China does not want to attack Taiwan and the broad military consensus suggests that China does not yet have the capability to launch a full-scale “amphibious” military operation, he said.

“And let’s not forget that despite China’s fuss before, during and after the visit, it still couldn’t deter the visit,” Kaushikan said.

However, he added that accidents do happen and have happened in the past.

Former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said the potential for accidents was of greatest concern.

While war is unlikely any time soon, Rudd said the Chinese could see Pelosi’s visit as a US step back from the 1982 agreement to recognize a “one China policy.” Are concerned.

“Then I think we’re in a whole new world,” he said on CNBC’s “Capital Connection.”

“Relations between the two countries are becoming increasingly hot and difficult,” he said. “Simply remove the match and light the flame, and it will light more or less.”

“That’s what I’m worried about — not tomorrow, not next month, but definitely over the next few years, especially [Chinese President] Xi Jinping is likely to be re-elected or re-elected.”

But the possibility of war cannot be ruled out entirely, especially if a recovery in US-China relations is unlikely over the next decade, Rudd said.

Pelosi’s Taiwan visit made things worse: ex-Singapore diplomat

Source link Pelosi’s Taiwan visit made things worse: ex-Singapore diplomat

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