Pittsburgh

Pennsylvania voting bill hearing cut short by Senate – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-10-05 14:41:00 –

The Pennsylvania Senate hearing aimed at gathering views from the State Department on possible changes in election law ended shortly on Tuesday as the Wolf administration decided not to participate directly. Republican Chairman Dave Argar, State Secretary Veronica Degrafenreid, at a state government committee on a proposal to address ballot counting deadlines, the use of ballot drop boxes, and the exclusion of ballots from ballots. The Deputy Secretary said he could not understand why he did so. “We need public discussion, we need public explanation,” Argar said before offering to reconvene on Wednesday if he changed his mind. Questions from the committee. The bill, sponsored by seven Republicans and four Democrats, will retain state support. It will significantly expand mail voting options and will not change the Department of State’s ability to issue election guidance to counties criticized by the Republican Party last fall. Dropbox is still allowed, but it should be monitored continuously. In his written statement, the State Department called the proposed dropbox regulation awkward and said the bill would require it to meet the regulations that apply to standard polling stations. Box is the best practice for election management. ” The Senate’s proposal would end voters’ ability to put themselves on a permanent list for receiving mailed ballots. According to the State Department, the bill will allow counties to begin processing ballots by mail three days before the election day, reducing the time it takes to apply for ballots before the election. A Republican senator said he was disappointed that Degrafen Raid did not participate. Among them was Senator Christine Phillips Hill, R-York. He recalled the Wolf administration’s mantra of running a “working government.” Colette, D-Montgomery, said all court complaints about how the 2020 elections were held failed and explained that the hearing was a political drama. Senators knew that Degraf Fenraid wasn’t going to attend, according to Colette, but some Republican senators went to Harrisburg for a hearing anyway and paid taxpayers their expenses. Said it might be a burden.

The Pennsylvania Senate hearing, aimed at gathering views from the State Department on possible changes in election law, ended shortly on Tuesday as the Wolf administration decided not to participate directly.

The topic is a bill submitted last month by ranking the Democrats by the Republican Chairman and the State Commission, with ballot counting deadlines, use of ballot drop boxes, and dead voters from ballots. It was a proposal to deal with exclusion.

R-Schuylkill Chair Dave Argall said he could not understand why Deputy Secretary of State Veronica Degraffenreid did not appear.

“We need public discussion. We need public explanation,” Argal said on Wednesday before she offered to convene again if she changed her mind.

Wanda Maren, State Department’s Communications Director, said her office offered to provide written comments and answer written questions from the Commission.

The bill, sponsored by seven Republicans and four Democrats, maintains the state’s significantly expanded mail-voting options and issues election guidance to the county, a role criticized by the GOP last fall. Does not change the authority of the Department of State.

Dropbox is still allowed, but it should be monitored continuously. In his written statement, the State Department called the proposed dropbox regulation awkward and said the bill would require it to meet the regulations that apply to standard polling stations.

“These requirements will put a heavy burden on our county and hinder the use of dropbox, which is an election management best practice,” officials told the commission.

According to the State Department, the Senate’s proposal will prevent voters from putting themselves on a permanent list for receiving mailed ballots. The list currently includes more than 2 million Pennsylvania voters.

The bill also allows the county to begin processing mail ballots three days before the election day, reducing the time it takes for voters to apply for mail ballots before the election. There is no need for stricter identification of voters, a change favored by many Republicans.

A Republican senator said he was disappointed that Degrafen Raid did not participate. Among them was Senator Christine Phillips Hill, R-York. He recalled the Wolf administration’s mantra about running a “working government.”

“It’s hard to work when you don’t show up,” she said.

However, Senator Maria Colette of D-Montgomery described the hearing as a political drama, saying that all court complaints about how the 2020 elections were held failed. Senators knew that Degraf Fenraid wasn’t going to attend, according to Colette, but some Republican senators went to Harrisburg for a hearing anyway and paid taxpayers their expenses. Said it might be a burden.

Pennsylvania voting bill hearing cut short by Senate Source link Pennsylvania voting bill hearing cut short by Senate

Back to top button