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Perseverance’s Martian rock samples may contain ancient water bubbles, NASA says – New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana 2021-09-12 10:16:00 –

Video above: Two Martian rock samples collected by NASA’s Persevier Lance Rover began digging for life on Mars may contain evidence of ancient blisters. I have. The ancient climate and habitability of Mars billions of years ago-and if it existed on the Red Planet, it could even preserve evidence of ancient life. We succeeded in collecting the first two rock samples on September 6th and 8th. The same rock called Rochette. Rover is currently exploring the Jezero Crater, which had an ancient lake over 3 billion years ago. “These rocks are of great scientific potential, so we decided to take two samples here,” said Katie Stack Morgan, a deputy project scientist at Perseverance. At NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California Institute of Technology. The rocks in the crater were able to tell scientists about the ancient volcanic activity in the area, whether water had existed for a long time, or whether water entered or exited in response to climate changes. Ken Farley, a project scientist at the California Institute of Technology’s Perseverance Mission, said: In the statement. “It’s a big deal that the water has been there for a long time.” Rochette rocks are basaltic in nature, which probably means they were created by ancient lava flows. Crystalline minerals in such rocks help scientists get very accurate dating and know when the rock was formed. Salt minerals in rocks are the result of rock changes over time. They may have formed when groundwater changed the original minerals in the lava, or when the water evaporated leaving salt. Groundwater may have once been part of a lake that filled the Jezero Crater and its river delta, but scientists cannot ignore it. Water may have passed through rocks even after the lake dried up and disappeared. The fact that there is. But rocks give hope to the Perseverance science team. Water may have existed long enough to create a habitable environment in which ancient microbial life could thrive. These two samples are the first of more than 30 samples collected by Rover and finally returned to Earth by multiple missions called Mars sample returns. Meenakshi Wadhwa, Chief Scientist for Mars Sample Returns at JPL and Arizona State University, said: “One is a sample recovery lander that actually picks up samples and carries them into orbit on Mars. Next, there is an orbiter, Earth Return Orbiter, that captures samples in these orbits, after which the return orbiter returns to Earth. “When we return to Earth, some of the samples will be investigated in different ways, but the rest will remain sealed, so future scientists with better skills will be able to do the same as the Apollo Lunar Module. You can study them in. ”These samples are expensive. Mitch Schulte, a mission program scientist at NASA headquarters, said in a statement. “One day, we may be able to unravel the order and timing of the environmental conditions represented by this rock mineral, which will help answer global scientific questions about the history and stability of liquid waters on Mars. More sample patience collects from intriguing points across the delta of Mars and the river, more likely scientists can stitch together Mars puzzles to answer the ultimate question. Shou: Has life ever existed on Mars? Lori Glaze, Director of Planetary Sciences at NASA, said: The two samples are currently stored in Rover’s titanium tubes and can eventually be recovered in future missions. Rover is preparing for another drive to the next possible sample site called South Seita, 656 feet away. The area, which was aerial reconnaissance by an Ingenuity helicopter during the last two flights, is full of dune-covered ridges, rocks and debris. Farley calls some of them “broken dinner plates.” The first two samples of Rochette rock probably represent some of the youngest rocks on the crater floor, but South Seita is probably a treasure trove of old rock formations, the history of the crater and its lake, but we have to wait. Must be. At the beginning of October, communication blackouts occur during Mars’ solar coupling when Mars and Earth are on opposite sides of the Sun. Perseverance will probably begin sampling exploration in South Seita after the end of this nearly two-week period.

Video above: NASA’s Perseverance Rover begins digging for life on Mars

According to NASA, the two Martian rock samples collected by the Perseverance Rover may contain evidence of ancient blisters.

It was found that the rock sample contained salt minerals. This could reveal insights into the ancient climate and habitability of Mars billions of years ago, and even preserve evidence of ancient life if present on the Red Planet.

Perseverance succeeded in collecting the first two rock samples on September 6th and 8th from the same rock, called Rochette, nicknamed Montagnac and Montagnac. Rover is currently exploring the Jezero Crater, which has an ancient lake over 3 billion years old.

Katie Stack Morgan, Deputy Project Scientist for Perseverance at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said:

The rocks in the crater were able to tell scientists about the ancient volcanic activity in the area and whether the water was or was present for a long time. It came and went as the climate changed.

These two rock samples indicate that groundwater is likely to have been present in the area for an extended period of time.

“Our first rock seems to reveal a potentially habitable and sustainable environment,” Ken Farley, a project scientist at the California Institute of Technology’s Perseverance Mission, said in a statement. rice field. “It’s a big deal that the water has been there for a long time.”

Rochette rocks are basaltic in nature, meaning that they are likely created by ancient lava flows. Crystalline minerals in such rocks help scientists get very accurate dating and know when the rock was formed.

Salt minerals in rocks are the result of rock changes over time. They may have formed when groundwater changed the original minerals in the lava, or when the water evaporated leaving salt.

Groundwater may have been part of the lake that once filled the Jezero Crater and its delta, but scientists ignore the fact that water may have passed through rocks even after the lake dried and disappeared. I can not do it.

But rocks give hope to the Perseverance science team. Water may have existed long enough to create a habitable environment in which ancient microbial life could thrive.

These two samples are the first more than 30 samples collected by Rover and finally returned to Earth by multiple missions called Mars Sample Returns by 2031.

“Our plan is to launch some missions,” said Meenakshi Wadhwa, Chief Scientist for Mars Sample Returns at JPL and Arizona State University. “One is a sample recovery lander that actually picks up samples and carries them into orbit on Mars. Next, there is an orbiter, Earth Return Orbiter, that captures samples in these orbits, after which the return orbiter returns to Earth. increase. “”

When returned to Earth, some of the samples will be investigated in different ways, the rest will remain sealed, and future scientists with better skills will study them in the same way as Apollo’s moon samples. You will be able to do it.

“These samples are of great value for future laboratory analysis back to Earth,” NASA headquarters mission program scientist Mitch Schulte said in a statement. “One day, we may be able to unravel the order and timing of the environmental conditions represented by this rock mineral, which will help us answer the full-scale scientific question about the history and stability of liquid water on Mars. increase.”

The more samples that patience collects from intriguing points across Mars and the Delta, the more likely scientists will be able to stitch together Mars puzzles that answer the ultimate question.

Lori Glaze, director of NASA’s Planetary Sciences Division, said:

The two samples are currently stored in Rover’s titanium tubes and will eventually be dropped where they can be recovered for future missions.

Rover is preparing for another drive to the next possible sample site called South Seita, 656 feet away. The area, which was aerial reconnaissance by an Ingenuity helicopter during the last two flights, is full of dune-covered ridges, rocks and debris. Farley calls some of them “broken dinner plates.”

The first two samples of Rochette rock probably represent some of the youngest rocks on the crater floor, but South Seita is a treasure trove of old rock formations that reveal more about the history of the crater and its lakes. There is a possibility.

But we have to wait. At the beginning of October, there will be a communication blackout between Mars and Earth. Mars Sun Bond, When two planets are on the other side of the sun. Perseverance will probably begin sampling exploration in South Seita after the end of this nearly two-week period.

Perseverance’s Martian rock samples may contain ancient water bubbles, NASA says Source link Perseverance’s Martian rock samples may contain ancient water bubbles, NASA says

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