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Pittsburgh OKs $335 million spending for American Relief Plan funds – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-07-20 12:11:00 –

Update-The Pittsburgh City Council voted on Tuesday to approve the city’s plan to spend $ 335 million on federal funding from the US Rescue Program. The vote was 8 to 1, with Councilor Deb Gross voting “no.” Click here for more information. List of City Allocations to the Federal Relief Fund Previous Story (July 14)-City Councilors voted in favor of Pittsburgh’s existing plan on how to use the $ 335 million US bailout program fund on Wednesday. I did. However, after the final vote next week, we plan to hold a meeting to hear the opinions of the public. “It’s dishonest to get public involvement after voting today. It makes you feel like you’re listening, not actually listening,” the council said. Member Erica Strassberger, one of the two who voted “no”. “I don’t think anything will change. I think it’s dishonest to pretend. More or a few more meetings,” said Teresa Kale Smith, chairman of the Council, one of the seven who voted in favor. He said he was going to change something just because he was late. “Some of the Pittsburgh community groups who wanted to spend more time seeking public opinion from Congress were disappointed. I think the community is disappointed. Jennifer Rafanan Kennedy, executive director of Pittsburgh United, told Acty in Pittsburgh. In News 4, “None of us have experienced a pandemic before and we need to discuss the need for recovery, so this money will reach people in our community who need it most urgently. The Democratic mayoral candidate ran before the council vote. He is in favor of advancing the immediate financial plans for this year and next year, but is delaying the decisions of 2023 and 2024. Gainy told Pittsburgh’s Action News 4. Council Finance Chairman Dan Ravel supports taking immediate action to facilitate spending plans. Direct funds to meet the city’s financial commitment. He also expressed sympathy for the need for funding raised by some community supporters, but said no other proposals were under the jurisdiction of the city. “Allegheny County does,” Ravel said. Similarly, Strassberger has shown that he is not criticizing all of his existing spending plans. “They want to hear their voice,” said Strathberger. Only councilor Fat Gross voted “against” in the 7-2 preliminary vote. Today’s assignment. In fact, I think there’s a very good reason not to vote for the four-year quota today, “Gross said. The final vote is set for next Tuesday.

update The Pittsburgh City Council resolved on Tuesday to approve the city’s plan to spend $ 335 million on federal funding from the US Rescue Program.

The vote was 8 to 1, with Councilor Deb Gross voting “no.”

Click here for a detailed list Of the city allocation for the Federal Relief Fund.

Previous story (July 14th)- The city council voted preliminary OK on Wednesday, adopting an existing plan on how to use Pittsburgh’s $ 335 million US rescue program. But they will hold a meeting to hear more from the general public after the final vote next week.

“It’s dishonest to get public involvement after voting today. It makes people feel like they’re listening, not actually listening,” said two of the two who voted “no.” One councilor, Erica Strassberger, said.

“I don’t think anything will change. It’s dishonest to pretend to change something because there’s more,” said Teresa Kale Smith, chairman of the Council, one of the seven who voted in favor. I think it’s because the meeting was delayed a little more. “

Some Pittsburgh community groups, who wanted Congress to spend more time on public opinion, were disappointed.

“I think the community is disappointed. We asked for something pretty reasonable. It’s time to hear and comment on the once-in-a-lifetime influx of investment into our community. “It was,” Secretary-General Jennifer Rafanan Kennedy Pittsburgh United Secretary-General told Action News 4 in Pittsburgh. “None of us have ever experienced a pandemic and we need to discuss the need for recovery, so this money reaches the people of our community who need it most urgently.”

Democratic mayoral candidate Ed Gainey ran before the council vote. He is in favor of adopting immediate funding plans for this year and next year, but is delaying the decisions of 2023 and 2024.

“The service we have to do to ensure that the city continues to operate and function is what we have to do. In all other respects, we are more transparent to the general public. , Should give them a chance to speak. “Ganey told Action News 4 in Pittsburgh.

Council Finance Chair Dan Ravel is now supporting actions to approve spending plans to facilitate financing to meet the city’s financial commitment. He also expressed sympathy for the need for funding raised by some community supporters, but said no other proposals were under the jurisdiction of the city.

“People have asked us to assist the Port Authority (Transit). It’s not our job. It’s not our responsibility. We have nothing to say about it. Allegheny County I will do that, “Ravel said.

Similarly, Strassburger has shown that she is not criticizing all of her existing spending plans.

“Many of the things in this assignment are good, but they want to hear their voice,” says Strassburger.

Councilor Deb Gross was the only other “no” vote in the 7-2 preliminary vote.

“I don’t think there’s a reason to vote for a four-year quota today. In fact, I think there’s a very good reason not to vote for a four-year quota today,” Gross said.

The final vote is set for next Tuesday.

Pittsburgh OKs $335 million spending for American Relief Plan funds Source link Pittsburgh OKs $335 million spending for American Relief Plan funds

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