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Police report 2nd death from tornado in northern Michigan – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2022-05-21 17:47:00 –

Authorities reported Saturday that a second person had died in a tornado that struck northern Michigan. The crew searched for a mobile home park that was virtually destroyed by a rare twister in an area without weather sirens. Lieutenant Derrick Carroll of State Police said Nottingham Forest Mobile Home Park on Gay Road, one of the first places to be hit by a tornado on Friday afternoon. The trailers were picked up and flipped over each other. It’s a very large debris field, “said Chris Martin, chief of the Otsego County Fire Department. “Currently, there are crew members conducting secondary searches using heavy equipment,” he said, “probably 95% destroyed.” Gay Road, a city of about 4,200 people, is about 230 miles northwest of Detroit. More than 40 people were injured. By Saturday morning, at least one person hadn’t been described, Carroll said, but he didn’t live in a mobile home park. Gretchen Whitmer declared a state of emergency and made more available state resources. Thousands of people in the area have lost electricity and some roads are still clogged with fallen poles and other debris. “We need to get rid of a lot of debris,” Carroll said. He was shredded. The car or truck was either lying sideways or completely upside down. In a video posted online, a dark funnel cloud is approaching when the driver you care about is staring at you or driving slowly. The National Weather Service pegged the tornado as EF3 on a scale of 0-5 with a maximum wind speed of 140mph. His son Steve Wisnievsky, who lives next to him, said he was injured despite the tornado’s devastating damage to his home. “She was praying. Gaylord Police Chief Frank Craze said the moment immediately after the tornado was tough for first responders.” We are looking for a place to know the residents. I was calling them by name, “said Mr. Craze. “It’s much more personal when our officers know the people who live in those homes.” Gaylord doesn’t have a tornado siren. About 10 minutes before the tornado hit, anyone with a cell phone was warned by the Meteorological Bureau of “Code Red,” Carroll said. I landed on the ground in this area for 26 minutes, “quite long”. “There aren’t many tornadoes,” said Boris, a science and operations officer. “In Michigan, it’s generally about 15 or so (a year) on average, many of which are below the state than in the north. Boris said warm 80 degrees air and Michigan at the beginning of Friday. He said strong winds moving east of the lake are an important condition for causing tornadoes. He said that the link to climate change is probably incompatible. There is something very special, “says Boris. “If these were more frequent, it might be a signal.”

Officials reported on Saturday that a second person had died in a tornado that struck northern Michigan. The crew searched for a mobile home that was virtually destroyed by a rare twister in an area without weather sirens.

Lieutenant Derrick Carroll of the State Police said the 70s lived in Nottingham Forest Mobile Home Park on Gay Road, one of the first places to be hit by a tornado on Friday afternoon.

According to Carroll, the first reported death was also lived there by another person in his 70s.

“The trailers were picked up and flipped over each other. It’s a very large debris field,” said Chris Martin, chief of the Otsego County Fire Department. “Currently, the crew is using heavy equipment to conduct a secondary search.”

He said, “Probably there is 95% destruction.”

A city with a population of about 4,200, Gay Road is about 230 miles northwest of Detroit.

More than 40 people were injured. By Saturday morning, at least one person hadn’t been described, Carroll said, but he didn’t live in a mobile home park.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer declared a state of emergency and made more available state resources. Thousands of people have lost electricity in the area, and some roads are still clogged with fallen poles and other debris.

“We have a lot of debris to get rid of,” Carroll said.

Indeed, the roofs and walls of some companies on the tornado road were shredded. Cars and trucks were either lying sideways or completely upside down. A video posted online showed a dark funnel cloud approaching while the anxious driver was staring or driving slowly.

The National Weather Service pegged the tornado as an EF3 on a scale of 0-5 at a maximum wind speed of 140 mph.

Despite the tornado causing serious damage to her home, 87-year-old Betty Wisnievsky avoided injury, said her neighbor’s son Steve Wisnievsky.

“Fortunately, she was fine-I got the Rosary,” he said from the ladder, attaching plastic to the windows. “She was praying. It’s pretty cool.”

Frank Craze, police chief of Gaylord, said the moment immediately after the tornado was tough for first responders.

“We were looking for a place to know the resident, we were calling by name,” Mr. Craze said. “It’s much more personal when our officers know the people who live in those homes.”

There are no tornado sirens on Gay Road. About 10 minutes before the tornado hit, anyone with a cell phone was warned by the Meteorological Bureau of “Code Red,” Carroll said.

John Boris, the Meteorological Bureau of Gaylord, said the tornado passed through the community in about three minutes, but it was a “quite long” time of 26 minutes in the area.

“There aren’t many tornadoes,” said Boris, Head of Science and Operations. “In Michigan, it’s generally about 15 or so (1 year) on average, many of which are subordinate to the north. It’s pretty rare.”

Boris said early Friday that warm, 80-degree air and strong winds moving east of Lake Michigan were key conditions for creating a tornado.

He said the link to climate change probably didn’t fit.

“It’s very difficult to attribute such a very special thing to such a large signal,” Boris said. “If these were more frequent, it might be a signal.”

Police report 2nd death from tornado in northern Michigan Source link Police report 2nd death from tornado in northern Michigan

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