Kansas City

Rapper Mega Ran on the changing face of nerdcore – Kansas City, Missouri

Kansas City, Missouri 2021-10-21 20:10:05 –

Mega run. // Photo by Chas Wright

Rapper Raheem Jarbo, known to hip-hop fans around the world as a megarun, has produced numerous albums over the last decade that cover all aspects of Comic Book.It’s a Halloween-flavored horrorcore Great Makai Village A series of releases, inspired by literature Dewey Decimal Collaboration with MC Lars, or old-fashioned wrestling atmosphere Matt Mania, Jarbo’s lyrics go deep into the theme of nostalgia and pop culture.

This week, the latest Mega Ran release will be released.Granted Live ’95, Jarbo, in honor of one of the greatest sports video games of all time, explores “the essential relationship between hip-hop, basketball, and the culture of the city center that allowed each to thrive.” I’m watching Megarun will also be on stage in Kansas City the same day the new album is released, so I talked to the rapper about his influence and his relationship with KC.

Pitch: The last time I saw you play was Lawrence, on a tour with MC Lars and MC Chris. I think it was solid 10 years ago. What I find interesting is that this is also a similar kind of community building package tour itself. What is the attraction of doing a package tour?

Mega Run: Well, I think it gives us the opportunity to combine all our fan bases and supporters. All of them can come out and see everything they want to see at once. We have been playing together for years. Bringing everyone together in one package gives you more incentive to catch every part of the show. You know, there is, there is no opener. You just go in and see exactly what you came to see. I think it’s the best way to experience things these days.

The key to this tour, and all the tours this fall, is the chance to play live for the first time in a year and a half. You have found some interesting ways to connect with your fans. You got a Twitch stream and released an autobiography, but what was it like when you tried to reinvent how you would describe yourself in the world?

It wasn’t easy, but life is an opportunity for me to get them done because these are the projects I’ve already wanted to do for a long time and I wanted to spend more time streaming and finishing the books. Gave me. Focus more on them. I was very happy to be able to do that. I think it was a natural progress for me. Over time, I would have accomplished it, but my schedule was open, so it was able to grow.

It was definitely a pivot. I missed playing crazy, but we did a lot to float, mostly livestream shows and Twitch streaming, but they’re also fun and I’m doing It was connected to. I don’t know if it’s an overall pivot, but at least in part, I think it happens naturally over time.

I always think you’re surprisingly prolific, so I think it’s tied to your overall career.

I want to put it on my bio.

keep it up! Was it born of a desire to make music inspired by everything you enjoy or something else? All the albums you release, including new ones, are all based on these different themes.

Themes and content, for me, I think I was able to stay motivated by using different parts of the brain and recovering different parts from childhood or from the most influential moments of life. I saw the phrase “creativity is the task force of energy” somewhere, and as long as it is stimulated, it gives us continuous energy. Today, when I couldn’t find that inspiration, there was always a past looking back on really fun moments. And that allowed me to open my heart and create something new. As always, I think my personality is. I always felt like I started late, and the music became the bread and butter of my later life, and I always wanted to catch up.

I had a lot of ideas that came up, but for a long time they were meaningless, lacking know-how, lacking techniques and resources. And now I’m trying to do, I just want to make sure I get everything.

I went to Sunday school on my way home, and they said, “When you have a gift, you can’t be selfish with it. You have to give it to the world. You anymore. It’s not something. ”I keep that in mind and feel it important to bring these things to the world. I think it’s important for 10 or 10,000 people to get rid of these things from me, rather than running around forever in my head.

What I always find fascinating about your career is the idea that you didn’t become a full-time professional musician until you were in your early thirties. You were a teacher and a musician for quite some years before making that leap. How have you been in the last decade compared to the first few years when you first left education?

So: What has it been like in the last 10 years? How much time do you have? [laughs] Are you just talking about the show you saw 10 years ago? It was a couple of months after I quit my job as a teacher. It was my first real gig experience as a full-time musician on that tour and it was a baptism by fire. We did something like 40 shows in 50 days. I played with a large audience all over the country that I had never heard of before. Meanwhile, I approached the opener and the Lars who were there and continued to work with them.

It was arguably the best dive board to jump off, and the best springboard possible was with its sword. Otherwise, I don’t know if I had a bad experience. I would soon return to teaching the next semester. [laughs] But we’ve been there for the last decade as we’ve really worked and got a good burst and a straight group of supportive fans in the scene.

There were ups and downs from learning pain and growing up, but I want to do this above all else. Fortunately, ten years later, people still want to hear middle-aged men rap about nerds through pandemic hell and high waters. It’s really a blessing. Really so.

There is a connection with Kansas City. Kansas City musician Kadish Flow.. I’m wondering how the two originally came to work together.

Hey you. Kadesh is my boy, man, I love him very much. He is very talented. Just a great musician. Play the trombone and rap. Everything is done at a very high skill level. I think we were able to stimulate each other. I remember when he first started, he sent me messages and emails asking for tips on how to get things done and advice on how to stay motivated. Tips for streaming and listening to content. That is all the conclusion.

It’s as if I know a lot of talented people, but not at his level, so it was really nice to see his growth and evolution. We have done a lot of collaboration. We are together in a group called NPCs. It attended the convention, realized that not many people looked like us, and began investigating why it was so many. I didn’t feel like they saw themselves represented in a place like this.

Our collective is undoubtedly focused on diversity. We come to the convention, talk and panel, and talk to people about diversification in the otaku space. Not only hip-hop music and jazz, but also their passion. There are so many that we have found a common rationale.

When i first heard NPC Collective, I was impressed with the name. Because NPCs are a very powerful statement about where colored people are in the more epic nerds. It is a very clear statement of purpose.

Yeah, absolutely. That was the goal there, and the double meaning of the reason. For those who don’t know, NPCs are “non-player characters”, or background bit players. A character that may be useful in advancing a story that is not mentioned or even has no name or face. It’s just a stepping stone to the place you need to reach.

And if it doesn’t encapsulate the experience of colored races, it’s definitely intentional and still needs to be done, as we don’t know what else we can do. So we’re here. I’m going to the convention now, seeing so many different background faces and I love it, but yeah, I still have to do it, so I’ll keep going.

Nerdcore can encapsulate so many different things. This next album, Live ’95, It’s great because when people think of otaku hip hop, they think of video games, anime, manga, etc., but this is about basketball. It’s not that I’ve never been to sports before, but I’ve released an album based on professional wrestling, but I like to overthrow expectations about what this theme is.

Yeah, sure. That is also very intentional. I don’t want everyone to think of nerds or hip-hop, so it has to be this much, or just represent one way in the nerd world. Like anime and manga, collecting trading cards was also an otaku. Especially because I was able to know the pedigree of Scott Summer’s family, I was able to know the average per game for Michael Jordan’s first 10 seasons. I was just as geeky about these things, and all these things helped shape me.

People don’t think athletics are geeks, but as you know, being passionate really means geeks, after all. It was just that you had a passion to help you survive the day and that was really my focus. I’m happy to be able to bring in another factor that contributes to the evolution of what I can do.

And that wasn’t a record, I would have been relieved to put it out 10 years ago. I thought, “Oh, I’m scared of basketball and sports,” but I don’t care anymore. I’m very happy that I can make what I like and the people who support me will surely be interested and listen to it, and I think there are some of the best works.


Mega Ran, along with MC Lars, MC Frontalot and Schaffer the Darklord, will hit Angkor at the Uptown Theater for their fourth jockey tour on Friday, October 22nd.Details of the show here..



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