Pittsburgh

Remembering 9/11 – A growing Flight 93 memorial in Pa. – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-09-11 21:00:00 –

Flight 93 National Memorial in Somerset County is where the memories of the brave passengers and crew who died on September 11, 2001 live. That day, September 11, “said Katie Hosteler of the National Park Service. But the monument is evolving. Twenty years after Flight 93 was unloaded at this abandoned strip mine, the monument grew around it. Beyond the current name barrier, 40 passengers and crew died that day 20 years ago. This is where their story is told-call home from an airplane, or speak in your own voice, representing an innocent person with 40 wind chimes on a 93-foot-high instrument. “It’s symbolism,” said Hosteler, a spokesman for the park service. “The sidewalks have these small notations, diagonal lines that symbolize the hemlock tree.” “When Flight 93 crashed, thousands of gallons of jet fuel were poured into the trees and ignited. When the first responders came to the scene, the first thing they saw was these burnt hemlocks. A few minutes after the crash of Flight 93, state police officers found an ATM bank card placed between the trunks of a Hemlock tree, which was hijacked. The criminal bought a ticket to board the plane that day. Forty separate tablets listing each passenger and crew directly match the flight path of the plane. The boulder, just beyond the wall, also has a purpose. At the request of the family, the boulder is placed at the end of the tree line. To mark the approximate location of the collision, “said the hostel. This is the last resting place for passengers and crew. Only their family can gather here. “They were very nice and very courageous,” said monument visitor Dorothy Reach. Reach’s husband, Leroy, said, “You just suffocate me.” The couple came to honor the lost people in commemoration of their 59th anniversary. “It’s a beautiful, peaceful and wonderful day,” said Dorothy Reach. All areas of the monument honor innocent people who boarded Flight 93 for 81 minutes. “The monument is a great place.” The hostel said. “When you visit, I think everyone has this idea of ​​what they are trying to see, and they get here, And they see this huge open meadow, and all the emotions of September 11 are overwhelmingly back. ”

Flight 93 National Memorial in Somerset County is where the memories of the brave passengers and crew who died on September 11, 2001 live.

“There’s a lot to see and incorporate here at the monument, and we’ll be back on September 11th,” said Katie Hosteler of the National Park Service.

But the monument is evolving. Twenty years after Flight 93 was unloaded at this abandoned mine, the monument grew around it.

Beyond the current one Name wallTwenty years ago, 40 passengers and crew died that day.

This is where their story is told — calling home from an airplane, Voice towerA 93-foot-high instrument, there are 40 wind chimes representing innocent people on board.

“Almost everything is symbolic,” said Hostetler, a spokesman for the memorial park services.

“These little notations, sidewalks have diagonal lines that symbolize the hemlock tree,” says Hostetler. “When Flight 93 crashed, thousands of gallons of jet fuel were poured into the tree limit and ignited. The first respondents to see these burns when they came to the scene. It is the outline of the Hemlock Grove. “

“45 minutes after the crash of Flight 93, state police officers found an ATM bank card placed between the trunks of a hemlock tree, which hijackers board the plane that day. I bought a ticket for. “

A marble wall with 40 separate tablets listing each passenger and crew is in direct agreement with the flight path of the plane.

The rock just beyond the wall also has a purpose.

“At the request of the family, the boulders are placed at the edge of the tree limit line, indicating the approximate location of the collision,” says Hostetler.

This is the last resting place for passengers and crew. Only their family can gather here.

“They were very nice and very courageous,” said monument visitor Dorothy Reach. “You have to do-I’m going to suffocate.”

“I wonder what they were thinking,” said Reach’s husband, Leroy.

The couple chose to spend their 59th wedding anniversary at a commemorative ceremony and came to honor those who lost their lives.

“It’s a beautiful, peaceful and wonderful day,” said Dorothy Reach.

All areas of the monument honor each of the innocent people who boarded Flight 93 for 81 minutes.

“The monument is a great place,” said Hostetler. “When you visit, I think everyone has this idea of ​​what they are trying to see, and they get here, and they see this huge open meadow, And all the emotions of September 11 are overwhelmingly back. “

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