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Repair and reuse could increase textile work by 25% in the Netherlands: Report

The move to a fully cyclical apparel industry in the Netherlands will not only impact the environment, but will also bring employment benefits and increase job creation by 25%, according to a new report. The report outlines three circulation scenarios: changing consumption patterns, prioritizing reuse and repair, and expanding fiber-to-fiber recycling.

According to a report titled, Reuse and Repair Prioritization proves to be most beneficial to the job market. Utilization of Circular Textiles: Potential for Employment of Circular Wear in the Netherlands According to Circle Economy’s Circular Jobs Initiative and HIVA-Research Institute for Work and Society. However, realizing such a scenario requires bridging current skill gaps and re-skilling and improving workers. From (re) manufacturing designers to quality evaluators to resale collection managers. Bring a new career.

The garment industry accounts for about 5% of global emissions, and workers around the world are exposed to unethical working conditions prevailing in this area. In the Netherlands alone, on average, residents buy one new piece of clothing a week, and one truck’s worth of clothing is burned or incinerated worldwide every second.

According to the report, facilitating garment reuse and repair will be of greatest benefit. 25% of industry job creation due to growth in the second-hand market and increased demand for repair and maintenance services. May increase. This is equivalent to the new full-time equivalent (FTE) of 24,286 for repairs and maintenance, with 17,319 FTEs shifting from the beginning to the second. –Additional 4,611 FTEs for pre-sale.

Some of the skills required for this scenario already exist in the Dutch labor market. Repair and maintenance, logistics and procurement, manufacturing, management, sales and retail, waste management, and industrial cleaning skills are already in clothing. It appears throughout the product value chain. While the need for these skills becomes more and more common as we move towards more cyclical systems, there are also new jobs in technology, e-commerce and textile sorting to better support repairs and cycling. The report says it will increase.

The research leader also worked with Amsterdam-based social enterprise Makers Unite to further investigate the skill gaps in current and future business models.

“I believe that the transition to a circular economy model begins with understanding how to make the most of existing resources, substances and people. The innovations needed for skill forces promote social inclusion. It will create new opportunities for us, and that’s why we’ve focused on new business models, ”said Thami Schweichler, Managing Director of Makers Unite.

The report states that the implementation of the scenario is devoted coordination among relevant actors, from stakeholders in the Dutch government and private sector to academia and educational institutions, and that workers are left behind or unethical. It states that action is needed to ensure that it is not exposed to working conditions. Training and retraining take a holistic approach, in addition to the employed workforce, unemployed and gradual. It must be directed to those at risk of being abolished in the Netherlands, and the role of vocational education and training must be recognized as essential for advancing and rebuilding the circular economy. The COVID-19 pandemic is better.

Fiber2Fashion News Desk (KD)

The move to a fully cyclical apparel industry in the Netherlands will not only impact the environment, but will also bring employment benefits and increase job creation by 25%, according to a new report. The report outlines three circulation scenarios: changing consumption patterns, prioritizing reuse and repair, and expanding fiber-to-fiber recycling.



Repair and reuse could increase textile work by 25% in the Netherlands: Report

Source link Repair and reuse could increase textile work by 25% in the Netherlands: Report

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