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Researchers show how to use photoacoustics to monitor the water content of the skin

Researchers at Skoltech and the University of Texas Medical Branch (USA) have shown how to use photoacoustics to monitor the water content of the skin. This is a promising technique for medical applications such as tissue trauma management and cosmetology. A paper outlining these results is Biophotonics journal.

(Swelling caused by the accumulation of water) or dehydration. This can also have cosmetic implications. Currently, electrical, mechanical, and spectroscopic methods can be used to monitor tissue water content, but they are accurate, non-invasive, providing the high resolution and critical probing depth required for potential clinical applications. There is no such method.

Sergei Perkov of the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials and his colleagues decided to test whether photoacoustic could be used for this purpose. In photoacoustic monitoring, the tissue is irradiated with pulsed light, and the target that absorbs this light expands thermoelastically, and the target can be detected by an ultrasonic signal. Previous studies have shown that photoacoustic spectroscopy detects hemoglobin, melanin, and water, and the team decided to investigate whether this method could be used both in tissue models and in vivo in real skin. did.

OA technology is safe for clinical application because the amount of energy absorbed by living tissue required for signal detection is relatively small. The advantage of OA technology over other optical methods is that the laser energy needs to be delivered in only one direction (absorber) and then detects while detecting the generated ultrasonic signal that is less attenuated in living tissue. Is what you need to do. For signals using optical methods, the light beam must propagate to the absorber and return (or pass through the whole body). “

Dmitry Gorin, Professor and Co-author of Scortech

Researchers have built two layers of “skin phantoms” from gelatin and milk, and used water to build some of them to mimic the swelling beneath the top “epidermis” layer. They also tested photoacoustic detectors on edema-free human wrists. The data they obtained are in good agreement with previously published data on skin water content, allowing the team to identify the optimal wavelength for monitoring water content.

The team then conducted similar experiments on actual edema in vivo to increase the number of different wavelengths used to generate the OA signal in order to quantify the water content of different layers of skin. I am planning. This work will continue in collaboration with Professor Rinat Esenaliev of UTMB Galveston.

Source:

Skoltech Institute for Science and Technology

Journal reference:

Perkov, SA, et al. (2020) Photoacoustic monitoring of water content in tissue phantoms and human skin. Biophotonics journal. doi.org/10.1002/jbio.202000363.

Researchers show how to use photoacoustics to monitor the water content of the skin

Source link Researchers show how to use photoacoustics to monitor the water content of the skin

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