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Review: ‘Sound of Metal’ follows deaf drummer with masterful use of silence – Washington, District of Columbia

Washington, District of Columbia 2020-11-20 00:26:34 –

This Friday, “Sound of Metal” will be shown in some theaters before it will be screened on Amazon on December 4th.

WTOP’s Jason Fully reviews “Sound of Metal”

This was one of the outstanding streaming films at the Middleberg Film Festival last month.

This Friday, “Sound of Metal” will be shown in some theaters before it will be screened on Amazon on December 4th.

The story follows heavy metal drummer Ruben and his lead singer girlfriend Lou driving from town to town in a mobile home. But when Ruben begins to lose hearing, they have to decide their future as a band and as a couple.

These settings allow for expressive performances by Riz Ahmed from Nightcrawler (2014) and The Night of from HBO (2016). This time, we blended Miles Teller’s hungry drummer in “Whiplash” (2014) and Mickey Rourke’s injured loneliness in “The Wrestler” (2008), “Why me?”

Ahmed is forced to tell much of the story through his eyes, but Olivia Cooke plays a challenging role, just like his girlfriend, and is forced to communicate with him through handwritten notes. Shout metal lyrics to his ferocious drum beats before. After “Bates Motel” and “Me and the Count and the Dying Girl”, her talent is not surprising.

Ahmed and Cook deserve most of their work, but Paul Rachi (“Gorius”) decides to consider Oscar’s Best Supporting Actor Award as Joe, a wise remote operator for the hearing impaired. Deserves. His melancholy performance helps Ruben learn sign language through tough love and complete immersion, and swipes his phone to instill a quest for inner nirvana.

We pay tribute to the Deaf community, especially the authors Darius Murder, Derek Cianfrance and Abraham Murder, who have created an insightful view of the taboo nature of ear implants. Unlike the stupid Netflix reality dating show “Deaf U,” filmed at Gallaudet University, it takes seriously some of the population treated with caution, dignity and respect.

This is a role switch, as Murder co-authored Cianfrance’s “The Place Beyond the Pines,” but Cianfrance is now co-authoring for Marde’s supervision. As a filmmaker, Murder adopts a stunning sound design, stringing the soundtrack with distorted sounds, tinnitus, and completely immersing himself in the shoes of a deaf drummer. Few movies make good use of silence.

It’s all built into an inspiring end act that provides just enough closure, without sacrificing artistic ambiguity. The final shot is cinematic perfection, reminding the viewer to block out noise and enjoy silence. I know that peace is the ability to sit with myself.

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