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Rodeo Crown Robgan entertains crowds across the United States: NPR

Rob Gunn is wearing clown makeup in the locker room behind the scenes at the Adirondack Stampy Rodeo in Glens Falls, NY.

NPR’s M. Scott Brauer


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Rob Gunn is wearing clown makeup in the locker room behind the scenes at the Adirondack Stampy Rodeo in Glens Falls, NY.

NPR’s M. Scott Brauer

One hour before showtime, Rob Gann is late. He needs to make up, climb outfits, make flash bang fireworks and provide a great noisy finish to his actions.

“Most clowns have a little arson habit,” Gan laughed. “The end result is that you blow something up.”

41-year-old Gan lives in Lonoke County, Ark, where his family raises horses. However, he spends most of the weekend on the road working on his crafts. Over the last six years, he has emerged as one of the most sought after rodeo crowns in the country. This is the latest in his decades of rodeo career.

Last night he was in Glens Falls, NY, and appeared in front of a sold-out crowd of Adirondack tampy rodeos.

Cowboy boots for sale at the Adirondack Stampede Farm Howstuck Shop booth at Cool Insuring Arena in Glens Falls, NY.

NPR’s M. Scott Brauer


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Gann wears leg braces when dressing in the locker room behind the scenes.

NPR’s M. Scott Brauer


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Rob Gunn talks before playing with bullfighter Phil Hasman in the locker room behind the scenes.

NPR’s M. Scott Brauer


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After equipping the gunpowder for the finale of his act, Gunn sits in a folding chair, bends over a small hand mirror, and begins to paint his face. “I feel like I’m not myself when I put on make-up and costumes,” he says. “I’m like walking in the soil and getting ready to start the game.”

The venue is an ice hockey arena that looks more like Montana or Wyoming than northern New York. A thick layer of soil has replaced the ice. The lean Broncos and the giant bull move restlessly in the enclosure while waiting for action.

“My parents were rodeos when I was born,” Gunn said, adding the finishing touches to face paint. “When I was a kid, I brought drugs to the rodeo and I fell in love with it.”

That’s one of the reasons why cancer is comfortable with joking and clowning about the very real dangers of this sport. He has lived it. He graduated from college on a bull for years — he was a school teacher for some time — received a rodeo scholarship.

“I know you’re fixing [ride] It’s a unique sensation, perhaps for animals that could kill you, “says Gunn. It’s cool. “

Audiences pray in front of Adirondack Stampede at Cool Insuring Arena in Glens Falls, NY

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Gunn, who works as a rodeo clown, prays behind the scenes before entering the arena.

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Gun plays in Adirondack Tampede.

NPR’s M. Scott Brauer


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Cool and often brutal. Rodeo is a booming sport. Consider NASCAR, which uses Bulls and Broncos instead of race cars. Many modern bull riders wear helmets and chest protectors, but serious injuries are considered part of the sport.

After deciding that there was no future for a top-notch rodeo athlete, Gunn began looking for ways to stay in life, initially working as a “bullfighter.” They are men and women who charge to rescue cowboys after they have been thrown out of bulls and bronco.

But even in its supporting role, the danger is daunting. The cancer has broken so many bones that it is difficult for him to track. “When the bull attacked me and threw it into the air, I separated the pelvis, and I split my legs and landed,” he says.

When the reporter flirts with the explanation for the cancer injury, he grins and says, “Well, you asked.”

Gann has been a little stiff lately. Before pulling on the boyish oversized clown pants, he straps his knee braces to his legs. He says he knew that if he wanted to continue the rodeo circuit, he had to do something different, safer.

Rodeo Crown Robgan helps move fire props for trick riders.

NPR’s M. Scott Brauer


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Gann playing, left, Miss Rodeo New York Madalin Julenko preparing to enter the arena, right.

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Rob Gunn waits behind the scenes before going out to the arena to play.

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“I had some clown friends and I really enjoyed what they did and I thought I could do it,” he says.

In his mid-thirties, Gunn transformed into a larger-than-real character, with crowds roaring around the arena.

Clowns have been part of rodeo life since the early 1900s. Actions on the rodeo occur in intense bursts. The barrel rider spins the horse in a figure eight, and the cowboy chases the calf with a lasso.

Whenever there is calm, the gun capers into the spotlight, cracking wisely, teasing someone in the crowd, or ridiculing the cowboy.

After a rider landed hard on the soil, Gunn said, “I felt exactly like I was trying to get my wife out of Wal-Mart today. The result was the same. I was kicked in the ass.” ..

Gan says part of the rodeo crown’s job is to escape violence, joking about dangers and making the horrors of the crowd fun.

This night there is a crazy moment when a cowboy sits down on a shot on the back of a giant, furious bull with steakknife-like horns. The gate opens and the bull explodes all muscles and mayhem.

Bull riders compete in the Adirondack Stamped at the Cool Insuring Arena.

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Team Ropers compete in the Adirondack Stamped.

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A large cow with the words “Painted Pony Rodeo” stands outside the Adirondax Stampede.

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When the rider crashes into the ground, there is a group of gasping and moaning. Gunn is ready with his own pitfalls.

“Why is he trying to protect the brain he just told him to ride a bull?” He jokes. “He may not even have a brain left!”

His humor is ridiculous — think of the Three Stooges rather than the Marx Brothers. Cancer says that when he is actually injured, he always reads his behavior and is careful to curb his daily life.

Fortunately, all athletes are safe tonight. Soon, it was time for an explosion that restricted the behavior of cancer. He messed with a giant stick of red dynamite under his oversized trousers and shouted with excitement. “Everyone is real! Stick your finger in your ear!”

When the fireworks finally explode-a safe distance from his back-the gun spreads into the barn soil, and the crowd eats it up.

Cancer seems to have a great time. This latest act of his rodeo career is neither easy nor fascinating, says Gunn. But the clown stayed in a world that loved him, approaching bulls, cowboys, and the dangers he couldn’t stop.

After playing at Adirondax Tampede, Gunn waved to the crowd.

NPR’s M. Scott Brauer


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Rodeo Crown Robgan entertains crowds across the United States: NPR

Source link Rodeo Crown Robgan entertains crowds across the United States: NPR

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