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Roe v. Wade is overturned and people with disabilities are worried about how they will be affected: NPR

People with disabilities are worried about how the Supreme Court’s reversal will affect them disproportionately. Roe v. Wade..

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People with disabilities are worried about how the Supreme Court’s reversal will affect them disproportionately. Roe v. Wade..

Anna Money Maker / Getty Images

In 2008, about eight weeks after her second pregnancy, Robin Wilson-Beattie began her experience. Hyperemesis gravidarum, It made her have a terrible episode of vomiting. She experienced this condition and other complications such as pre-eclampsia during her first pregnancy four years ago and knew she could be bedridden, but this time she There was no support to help it.

With her 4-year-old son at home, she didn’t know if she could raise another child, so she decided to have an abortion. However, when she arrived at the clinic for her abortion, she was denied treatment because of a disorder caused by a spinal cord injury.

“They were reluctant to give me an abortion because I had a disability. [My] The paralysis scared them. i don’t know why The obstacles surprised them. They said I had to go to the doctor and do it at the hospital, so I had to take out health insurance. “

A groundbreaking decision in 1973 Roe v. WadeIt was overturned by the Supreme Court on Friday, which legalized abortion nationwide. Court decisions affect everyone, but people with disabilities, especially those with multiple marginalized identities, have medical inequality, sexual violence, poverty, and historically experienced loss of autonomy. , Affects disproportionately for a variety of reasons.

Robin Wilson-Beaty, a middle-aged black woman, wearing a yellow headband and glasses, taking a selfie.

Wilson-Beattie had to wait another two weeks from the time he first asked for an abortion. Wilson-Beaty was sexually assaulted by a doctor during her examination when she was finally able to schedule her, but she was quiet because she felt she had no other choice. It was as it was.

People with disabilities are at increased risk of having access to an abortion.according to Investigation According to the Department of Justice and Statistics, persons with disabilities were more than three times more likely to experience sexual assault than non-disabled persons. People with multiple disabilities are more likely.

Mia Ives-Rublee, director of the Disability Justice Initiative at the Center for American Progress, said access to abortion is critical to the survival of persons with disabilities. For example, Ives-Rublee does not know if it can reach gestation due to short stature, decreased vital capacity, and a fragile bone disease called osteogenesis imperfecta.

“If you cannot have an abortion [and] If you accidentally become pregnant, it can have serious health consequences. It’s a big concern for me as an individual who stays focused on my career and who wants to have choices in the matter, “she said.

The loss of physical independence has a deep history within the disabled community, says disability activist Emily Radau.As evidenced by the current problem: Forced sterility Under the adult guardianship system, people with disabilities are deprived of their right to choose their body. Radau recalls many moments of life, especially in the medical context, where he felt that his body was not entirely his own and did not play a role in his care.

“Knowing that your body always has the option to make the right choices is something I don’t think should be too much to ask for,” Radau said. “But when it comes to engaging with medical professionals, it’s very hard to know that in a world where I already have to fight for respect and autonomy with agents, it can be removed very easily. It ’s scary. ”

Emily Radau, a white woman sitting in a wheelchair and wearing glasses and a blue shirt "My body is worth it."
Emily Radau, a white woman sitting in a wheelchair and wearing glasses and a blue shirt "My body is worth it."

Radau points out that she has many privileges in a situation like a white woman and as someone who can express her needs verbally. This is not owned by everyone in the disabled community.

When Morenike Giwa Onaiwu was taken to the hospital after experiencing bleeding and pain at work, she was overwhelmed and unable to verbally tell the doctor what was happening. She relied on her colleague to explain that she had an abortion with her drug a few weeks ago. She believes her doctor felt strange that her colleague was talking for her and she wondered if she had the awareness to communicate with them.

Looking back on the abortion and emergency room visits a few weeks later, Giwaonaiu said they experienced a lot of pain and received inadequate treatment due to race and disability. After they had an abortion, doctors refused to see them, even though it was a standard protocol. They recalled that doctors said the termination was “for the best”, as pregnancy probably resulted in “some kind of mutation”.

When she was rushed to the ER with a colleague a few weeks after the abortion, she was given painkillers, but the pain continued to be intolerable. She asked for more medicine, but her doctor said she was treated badly because she thought she was exaggerating and showing her behavior asking for medicine.

“They asked me if I was taking medicine. I have ADHD with autism, so I mentioned the medicine. [With] I know that some people consider that the stimulants they take for ADHD are seeking drugs, taking them for entertainment purposes, or getting prescriptions that cannot be justified. I think there were some misunderstandings. “

Morenike Giwa Onaiwu, a black non-binary woman with a disability, taking selfies.
Morenike Giwa Onaiwu, a black non-binary woman with a disability, taking selfies.

After they stabilized, they discovered that they could have died of an abortion-induced infection due to the negligence of the doctor who performed the abortion. Placenta stagnant products In their bodies.

“This nightmare egg It was installed. Imagine what happens and what happens to people, especially people with disabilities, without legislative protection, “they said.

Ives-Rublee of the Center for American Progress says that those who are pregnant or have more needs, such as people with disabilities or people of color, will continue to have an abortion by traveling to another state or abroad. Said. She believes more organizations are working to create mutual aid programs to help pay for out-of-state abortion aid.

Wilson-Beattie said he had the privilege of having health insurance for abortion, but this does not apply to everyone. According to Ives-Rublee, women with disabilities are some of the lowest-income people in the United States.according to American Progress CenterThe poverty rate of women with disabilities is 22.9%, while that of men with disabilities is 17.9% and that of women without disabilities is 11.4%.

With capsizing Roe v. Wade, Radau is worried about the following:She points out that June 22nd was an anniversary Olmsted A decision declaring that people with disabilities have the right to be cared for in their homes and communities and to be members of a fully integrated community.Nevertheless Olmsted Is 23 years old and people with disabilities are still fighting for complete, equal and equitable access to a wider community.

“To the right, first and foremost, it’s scary to think that people’s lives have changed, but not enough, but they can continue to rethink the cases that have already been decided. A group of people anointed with this power determined that it was okay and could turn around long-standing civil rights that people with disabilities had not yet fought, “Radau said.

Roe v. Wade is overturned and people with disabilities are worried about how they will be affected: NPR

Source link Roe v. Wade is overturned and people with disabilities are worried about how they will be affected: NPR

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