Colorado Springs

Suspected Colorado Springs street racers could face stiffer consequences — and City Council signals approval | Colorado Springs News – Colorado Springs, Colorado

Colorado Springs, Colorado 2021-02-22 19:30:00 –

Members of the Colorado Springs City Council appeared on Monday in support of an ordinance allowing police officers to seize vehicles believed to be related to crime to reduce street racing in the city.

Under the proposed law Police may seize vehicles that police officers have used or believed to have contributed to the illegal activityIncludes police escape during traffic outages, gang-related activities, drive-by crimes, street contests or prostitution. The seizure is due to a civil lawsuit.

David Edmondson, commander of the Sand Creek Division of the Colorado Springs Police Department, said the proposal would “support public safety” and help slow down the entire city.

“What we really care about is the positive ways we can influence the behavior here in Colorado Springs,” he said.

While expressing support, the councilor expressed concern about parents and lien owners who may unknowingly use the vehicle in street racing.

According to Edmondson, if the owner is unaware of the vehicle’s use, police will issue a warning letter before seizing the vehicle, and if the vehicle is used twice in criminal activity, police will call a city lawyer. He added that he may provide evidence. Issue a court order to seize the vehicle.

The owner of the vehicle can challenge the confiscation in court, but if the owner does not respond, the city will be authorized to seize the vehicle in accordance with the proposed ordinance.

“This is great. This will definitely save lives,” said Council Chair Richard Skoman. The council was able to vote for the ordinance in two weeks.

Police do not have to arrest or convict a suspect to seize a vehicle.

According to the ordinance, if the owner pays a towing fee and a civil judgment fee of $ 500, the city will release the vehicle. If the owner of the car refuses to pay the fee within 60 days of receiving the final court ruling, the car will be declared abandoned.

Police considered a similar ordinance in Denver when developing a strategy for Colorado Springs, Edmondson said. Denver passed the ordinance almost two years ago, he said, with fewer street races in the city, and said some racers had moved to other areas, including Colorado Springs.

“It’s like they come to Colorado Springs because they don’t have this process here and escape the consequences of their actions,” Edmondson said.

According to police data, residents of Colorado Springs made 502 calls to report street races, and police officers made 25 calls between January 1, 2020 and November 30, 2020. Called. Data show that 24 tickets were issued during the same period.

The proposed ordinance is different from civil confiscation if the police station can seize the vehicle permanently, but as charges are incurred, it can be costly to retrieve the vehicle.

According to the city’s website, in addition to a $ 500 civil fine, owners have to pay a $ 47 fine, $ 75 per hour for towing-related costs, and $ 30 each day the vehicle is stored in the reservoir. There is.

On its website, the American Civil Liberties Union used civil confiscation to neutralize large criminal enterprises, but “defective” state and federal law benefits police stations. It is allowed to be used to bring.

According to the ACLU, legal recovery of vehicles is “notoriously difficult” and expensive, and the cost can exceed the value of the vehicle, so the demand for reform is increasing year by year.

Suspected Colorado Springs street racers could face stiffer consequences — and City Council signals approval | Colorado Springs News Source link Suspected Colorado Springs street racers could face stiffer consequences — and City Council signals approval | Colorado Springs News

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