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The last Salem witch’s name was finally cleared, thanks to an eighth-grade teacher and her students – New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans, Louisiana 2022-08-06 15:08:00 –

It’s never too late to right historic wrongs – even if justice is restored almost 330 years later. A plea by Carrie Lapierre, a Massachusetts teacher, and her 8th grade public school student book. Justice came in the form of a simple addition to the 2023 state budget. Johnson, along with over 200 of his other men and women in Salem, was accused of witchcraft in 1692. Of those convicted, 19 were hanged and four died in prison. Johnson was also scheduled to be executed, but he was later exonerated. It wasn’t until Carrie Lapierre, her eighth-grade civics teacher at North Andover Middle School, came across her story that the Massachusetts legislature took notice and involved her students in her case. She is a town in northeastern Massachusetts, just 40 minutes from Salem. But Lapierre said he had no idea how the Salem witch trials would resonate in the North Andover area until he read a book on local witches by historian Richard Haidt. Convicted witches were acquitted, many of them posthumously the late Johnson, or “EJJ,” as her students called her, Lapierre. I’ve been acquitted throughout the years, but somehow it went unnoticed,” Lapierre told CNN.While details of Johnson’s life are thin, her family was rife with hysteria, Puritan rule, and interfamilial feuds. She was one of 28 families accused of witchcraft in 1692, according to The Boston Globe. According to a 1692 document digitized by the Salem Witch Trials Documentary Archive at the University of Virginia, she “if she were a witch, should be saved”. Named several other people in Salem she said were involved. She also showed a knuckle that looked like a fellow “witch” had “sucked her”, according to a 1692 examination document. Johnson was sentenced to death at age 22, but she was granted a reprieve by the then governor (whose wife had also been accused of witchcraft). In 1711, after state officials found there was little evidence to convict women (and some men) of witchcraft and execute or imprison them, the later protagonist of Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible Johnson’s name has been left off this list, although many others have been acquitted or hanged, including John Proctor, who was one of the So in 1712 she petitioned Salem to include in a statute to pay restitution to the families of the accused. Imprisonment, which would thankfully be recognized as a great boon.” Why, exactly, Johnson was excluded is unclear. ‘ case and clearing her name could be an attractive project for students. .Johnson is the last Salem witch to be exonerated, so her eighth grader at LaPierre sets out to exonerate her EJJ, hoping that legislators will introduce legislation to clear her name. pleaded to Finally, after three years of “many disappointments,” a state senator heard them. Diana Dizoglio sponsored this year’s state budget amendment to add Johnson’s name to existing resolutions that acquit other “witches” by name. While bureaucratic navigation was beneficial to her eighth grade class, LaPierre said: The amendment added Johnson’s name to a 1957 resolution that exonerated several people convicted of witchcraft, and Johnson’s request for pardon was eventually granted. Continuing: Now that Johnson’s case is over, she must find a new project for the upcoming 8th grade. We’re leaving it to decide policy. Whatever her students choose to tackle this year, the witches may be off the table. Johnson is the last woman convicted in the Salem Trials, acquitted. With that, Lapierre and her class ended a chapter in history that began centuries ago.

It’s never too late to correct historical wrongs. Even if the restoration of justice came nearly 330 years after him.

Elizabeth Johnson, Jr., who was convicted of witchcraft in the 1690s Salem witch trials, was acquitted last week after years of petitions by Massachusetts teacher Carey Lapierre and an eighth grade public school student. was handed down.justice is A Simple Addition To The 2023 State Budget.

Johnson was accused of witchcraft in 1692. More than 200 others Salem women and men. Of those convicted, 19 were hanged and four died in prison. Johnson was also scheduled to be executed, but he was later spared.

Yet, during Johnson’s life and in the centuries that followed, her name was never actually revealed. It wasn’t until her teacher, Carrie Lapierre, came across her story and involved her students in her case.

How to exonerate a convicted witch after over 300 years

The town of North Andover in northeastern Massachusetts is just 40 minutes from Salem.But until she read A book about local witches According to historian Richard Haidt, Lapierre said she didn’t know how the Salem witch trials resonated in the north Andover area – and it was in those pages that she learned about Johnson. .

While many other convicted witches were acquitted, many posthumously followed the late Johnson, or, as Lapierre and her students called her, “EJJ,” but “all other convicted witches.” The sentenced witch was somehow overlooked despite being innocent for years,” Lapierre told CNN in an email.

Details of Johnson’s life are sparse, but her family was a prime target in the Salem Witch Trials due to hysteria, Puritan rule, and interfamily feuds. I was one of a family of 28. boston globe.

Johnson made a persuasive confession during court interrogation. She persuaded another woman, Martha Carrier, to become a witch. Document of 1692 Digitized by the Salem Witch Trials Documentary Archive at the University of Virginia.

Some of the details of her story were demeaning and humiliating to Salem residents. He showed me his knuckles.

For her “crimes,” Johnson was sentenced to death at the age of 22. wife was sued of witchcraft).

In 1711, after state officials found little evidence to convict women (and some men) of witchcraft and execute or imprison them, acquittal So did many of those convicted or hanged, including John Proctor, who later became one of the main characters in Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible.

However, Johnson’s name was left off this list.So in 1712 she went to Salem included in the actprovided compensation to the defendant’s family.

in the letter, she asked “I hope that the Court of Honor will grant me something in view of my charges for my long imprisonment.

Exactly why Johnson was left out is unknown. But Lapierre, North of Her Andover, Her Historical Her Society, took up the case of a deceased “witch” and clearing her name would be a fascinating project for students. I decided it was possible. .

Johnson is the last Salem witch to be exonerated

So Lapierre’s 8th grade petitioned the Massachusetts legislature in the hope that they would set out to acquit EJJ and introduce legislation to clear her name. Finally, after 3 years and ‘many disappointments’, one state senator heard them – Diana DiZoglio sponsored the fix to this year’s state budget to add Johnson’s name to existing resolutions that exonerated other “witches” by name.

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Witch trials in Salem, Massachusetts. Lithograph by George H. Walker.

While petitions and bureaucratic navigation were all beneficial to her eighth grade class, LaPierre said: We understand that our community and the world need persistence to reach our goals. ”

This amendment changed Johnson’s name to Resolution of 1957 It exonerated several people convicted of witchcraft.

But LaPierre’s work continues. Now that Johnson’s case is over, she must find a new project for her upcoming eighth grade. This year, she’s tasking her students with determining the issues that concern them and the course of action to address them.

Whatever her students choose to tackle this year, witches may be off the table, with Johnson being the last woman convicted and acquitted in the Salem Trials. So Lapierre and her class ended a chapter in history that began centuries ago.



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