Pittsburgh

The story of a fentanyl victim – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-11-29 20:37:00 –

Matthew Davidson’s death was not unique. From May 2020 to April 2021, it was just one of the more than 100,000 deaths from drug overdose in the United States. This is a record of a country’s epidemic. Prison time; suffering and upset family and friends. Related video above: Overdose deaths in the United States exceed 100,000 a year, of course, he was always special to his mom. When she wants to feel familiar with him again, Karen Butcher wears a quilt made of her son’s favorite shirt. And to help others avoid her destiny, she trains herself and speaks openly to CNN. Helping other young addicts is a way to give hope to Matthew’s death. “They made Matthew’s legacy one of the things that prevented others from following the same path,” she said. Karen said Matthew was a gift to her from the beginning. .. He was a always-moving, flocking, lively boy. However, he also had health problems, suffering from hemophilia (a condition in which blood does not coagulate properly and can cause chronic pain), so Butcher needs to be aware of the trouble. I was looking for him, but nothing happened. She and Matthew’s stepfather, Jean Butcher, say they rebelled like any other teenager, but graduated from high school and left home. I didn’t have to worry about it until I started working at the restaurant. On a good day, he was a cheerful bartender and was happy to make people laugh. At one point he became ill with flu-like symptoms, which butchers now recognize as a sign of withdrawal. “He had trouble getting through the purse of a working woman one night,” Karen said. “He was, of course, looking for money and caught in a camera passing through those purses.” He also took him from his own family. Karen said, “I thought there were some missing pieces of jewelry and one of his friends came to my house. I never dreamed it was him. And he stole from a friend. “Matthew’s parents may have started his addiction with opioids prescribed for the severe pain often associated with hemophilia, then stole from his girlfriend. They say. I think he might have crushed them and started snorting, and then the transition to intravenous use came easily to a young man accustomed to injecting other drugs due to his condition. Maybe when he first went to rehabilitation, Karen wanted and believed her son would be the one to beat his addiction, but he recognized her as a general cycle of rehabilitation and recurrence. Until 2020 Memorial Day, Karen saw that she couldn’t answer the call from Matthew’s phone number and was preparing to visit her friend. She called. When fixed, it was Matthew’s girlfriend who picked up hysterically and they were on their way to the ER. She thinks he chose to take heroine that day, and it’s very deadly. Contaminated with a small amount of the drug fentanil, Karen told CNN that a record 100,000 people weren’t aware they were taking it. Of the deaths from overdose, 64,000 were murderers. “I think he was dead for a while because his body was cold,” she said. “I just remember screaming.’I wasn’t ready to let go of you.’ And spent a while alone with him, you know, tap his hair, he Touching his hand, he just seemed to be asleep. ”While Matthew was alive, his parents sought information and input about what he had experienced and how to help. Some of the comments didn’t help — the people he thought he could just quit or their rehab was a surefire way — but they were also introduced to the support group, like the parents of an addicted loved one. NS. Karen eventually founded the first chapter of the group in Kentucky and stuck to it trying to help others even after losing Matthew. “I don’t want to see this happen to others. I even have a special place in my heart for the sons of others,” she said. life? What is preventing you from continuing treatment? She knows how difficult it is to move from treatment to a life of recovery, but she is trying to find a way for people to reach out to her. She says she’s away from overwhelming loss statistics to make it easier to manage. “Who do you think I can help today?” She said. She wants to prevent others from suffering losses that can never be overcome. There are no more pictures of the holes in the pictures, all five of our sons, there are four pictures, “she said. “I imagine that photo or a hole in a family meal. There is no Matthew chair.”

Matthew Davidson’s death was not unique.It was just one 100,000 deaths from drug overdose Record of a pandemic in the United States from May 2020 to April 2021.

His life reflected the lives of many addicted people, both inside and outside rehab. Prison time; suffering and upset family and friends.

Related video above: Overdose deaths in the U.S. exceed 100,000 per year

Of course, he was always special to his mom. When she wants to feel familiar with him again, Karen Butcher wears a quilt made of her son’s favorite shirt. And to help others avoid her destiny, she trains herself and speaks openly with CNN.

Helping other young addicts is a way for her to give hope to Matthew’s death. “They made Matthew’s legacy one of the things that prevented others from following the same path,” she said.

Karen said Matthew was a gift to her from the beginning — born seven years after his brother she had been waiting for her second child.

He was a flocking, lively boy, always in motion. But he also had health problems. hemophilia, A condition in which blood does not coagulate properly and can cause chronic pain.

So Butcher was used to watching him for trouble, but nothing unusual.

CNN

Karen Butcher found some help in a parent group of addicted loved ones.

She and Matthew’s stepfather, Jean Butcher, say they rebelled like any other teenager, but they didn’t have to worry until they graduated from high school and started working in a restaurant. On a good day, he was a cheerful bartender and was happy to make people laugh. He also got sick with flu-like symptoms that butchers perceive as a sign of withdrawal.

“He was in trouble one night because he passed through the purse of a working woman,” Karen said. “He was, of course, looking for money and was caught by a camera passing through those purses.”

He also took it from his family. “I thought some of the jewels were missing and one of his friends came into my house,” Karen said.

“I wouldn’t have dreamed it was him, and he stole from a friend, and from a girlfriend.”

Matthew’s parents state that his addiction may have started with opioids prescribed for the severe pain often associated with hemophilia. They think he might have crushed them and started snorting, and then the transition to intravenous use is easy for young men who are accustomed to injecting other drugs because of his condition. You may have come to.

When he first went to rehab, Karen wanted and believed her son would be the one to beat his addiction.

However, he experienced what she perceived as a general cycle of rehabilitation and recurrence. He was even overdose several times, saved by the people who saw him and the emergency responders reviving him.

Until the 2020 anniversary.

Karen's butcher had a quilt made from Matthew's favorite shirt.

CNN

Karen Butcher had a quilt made from Matthew’s favorite shirt.

Karen was preparing to visit her friend when she saw a missed call from Matthew’s phone number. When she called back, it was Matthew’s girlfriend who hysterically picked up, and they were on their way to the ER.

She thinks he chose to take heroin that day, and it was contaminated with a small amount of fentanyl, a very deadly and powerful drug. Didn’t know they were taking it..

“I knew in my mother’s heart that my son was dead,” Karen told CNN.

She entered the hospital room to meet him.

“I think he was dead for a while because his body was cold,” she said. “I remember spending a while with him, shouting,’I wasn’t ready to let go of you.’ When I stroked his hair or touched his hand, he just slept. It looked like I was there. “

While Matthew was alive, his parents sought information and input about what he was experiencing and how to help.

Some comments didn’t help — people he thought he could just quit, or their rehab was a surefire way — but they were also introduced to support groups such as: Parents of addicted loved ones..

Karen eventually founded the first chapter of the group in Kentucky and stuck to it trying to help others even after losing Matthew.

“I don’t want to see this happen to others. I even have a special place in my heart for the sons of others,” she said.

“I got a call yesterday. He was probably experiencing 15 treatment programs and knew I had lost Matthew and I told him what you wanted in life. What is preventing you from staying in treatment? “

She knows how difficult it is to live a life of recovery from treatment, but she is trying to find a way for people to reach out to her.

She says she’s away from overwhelming loss statistics to make it easier to manage. “I wonder,’Who can I help you today,'” she said.

She wants to prevent others from suffering losses that can never be overcome. A mixed family of her and Jean’s five sons has always lost one.

“There are always holes in the pictures. There are no more pictures of all five sons. There are four pictures,” she said.

“Imagine that there is a hole in the picture and the family meal. There is no Matthew chair.”

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