Minneapolis

Trump’s Republican wall eroding ahead of impeachment vote – Twin Cities

2021-01-13 10:29:56 –

STEVEPEOPLES

The Republicans only provided a modest criticism when President Donald Trump said there were “very good people” on either side of the white supremacist rally. When Trump was found putting pressure on foreign leaders, they stayed in line and later defended his treatment of the deadly pandemic.

But sudden forces are beginning to erode the Republican support wall that has allowed Trump to survive a seemingly endless series of crises.

Mr. Trump’s weakening position within the party will focus more sharply on Wednesday, when the House of Representatives is expected to impeach the president for inciting a riot in the US Capitol last week. A handful of Republicans have already stated that they will participate in the effort, and that number could increase as votes approach.

The choices the Republicans are facing are not just Trump’s immediate fate, with only seven days left in the presidency. It’s about whether elected leaders of the party are ready to move away from Trump, which is now toxic in much of Washington, while being popular with many Republican voters.

Depending on how they proceed, it is possible to determine whether a party is viable in upcoming elections and debris in ways that may limit their relevance.

Steve Schmidt, a longtime Republican strategist who left the party for Trump, said: ..

The amazing nature of the deadly rebellion, and Trump’s role in fueling it, has upset many lawmakers. Congressman Liz Cheney, a third Republican in the House of Representatives, gave a green light to the Conservatives of Rank and File to abandon Trump in a bitter statement Tuesday evening.

“The betrayal of his office and the oath to the Constitution by the President of the United States is unprecedented,” she accused.

More ominous for Trump, the New York Times is pleased that Senate leader Mitch McConnell believes Trump has committed an impeccable crime and Democrats are against him. I reported that there was.

Citing unidentified people familiar with the influential Kentucky Republican ideas, the Times said McConnell said the opposition to Trump would help build a future independent of the divided and chaotic president. I reported that I believed.

Surprisingly, fast-moving development does not guarantee that Trump will resign before Democrat Joe Biden takes office on January 20th. The timing of the Senate trial is unclear and could spill over into Biden’s presidency.

But for the first time, there are real signs that important Republican factions want to get Trump out of their party.

Already, three Trump cabinet members have resigned in protest. Former Attorney General Bill Barr, who left the White House in less than a month, accused his former boss of “betrayal of his office.”

Vice President Mike Pence, whose relationship with Mr. Trump has deteriorated considerably since he and his family were forced to hide in the siege of the Capitol, issued a constitutional amendment to dismiss Mr. Trump. It took almost a week to publicly declare that it would not be activated.

Despite his asylum, Trump continues to be popular for a significant part of his political foundation. The remaining allies of the president have warned that Republicans across him are at risk of a conservative backlash in the next election.

“Public and private polls show that Republican grassroots voters are strongly opposed to impeachment,” said Jason Miller, Trump’s senior adviser. “Republican senators or members of the House of Representatives who vote for impeachment will be held liable in the next primary election.”

Trump emerged from his White House fortress for the first time since a riot for a trip to a wall built by his administration along the Texas border. When he left Washington, he carefully insisted that “we do not want violence,” but denied any responsibility for the riots.

As he reached the border, his remarks to the small crowd became quite modest. In the end, he spoke for only 21 minutes and spent less than 45 minutes on the ground in what was expected to be his last trip to the presidency.

Before leaving, he issued an ominous warning to Democrats and accused him of being dismissed. “Note what you want.”

The veiled threat came when the state, and members of parliament, prepared for more potential violence prior to Biden’s inauguration. The FBI warned this week about plans for armed protests in all 50 state capitals and Washington.

Some Republicans resisted the new rules, but security officials in the House of Representatives made a special decision from Tuesday requiring Congressmen to pass through metal detectors and enter the House of Representatives room.

It’s unclear if the Washington turmoil represents an existential threat to the party, but it’s arguably likely to undermine the Republican’s short-term political goals.

Political contributions to some of the major companies, many of which are definitely Republican donors, to any of the 147 Republicans who perpetuated Trump’s fraudulent election false claims by refusing Biden’s victory last week. I promised to stop sending.

The funding challenge is at a bad time for the Republicans. History suggests that the Republican Party, as a minority in Washington, should regain control of the House of Representatives or the Senate in 2022.

At the same time, an ambitious Republican collection is about to place themselves to run for the White House in 2024. They are also in conflict with Trump’s legacy.

One of them, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan, reminded reporters on Tuesday that he had accused President Trump from the beginning.

“I’ve been in the same place for four years, vowing not to leave the Republican Party,” said Hogan. “I left the party and let these people, who made hostile takeovers four years ago, take over. I don’t want to. “

Despite Hawley’s confidence, he is among Trump’s loyal foundations (a group that is likely to have a significant impact on the party’s president-elect election) in Texas Senator Ted Cruz and Missouri. Josh Hawley, much less popular than the other two 2024s. A prospect who voted to refuse Biden’s victory last week after the uprising.

“Republican leaders don’t know how to move forward,” said Republican pollster Frank Lunz. “Everyone is afraid that Donald Trump will tell people to come after them, but they are also aware that they are losing the center of America. They are trapped. . “

___

Associated Press writers Jill Corbin of Alamo, Texas and Siegmiller of Washington contributed to this report.

Trump’s Republican wall eroding ahead of impeachment vote – Twin Cities Source link Trump’s Republican wall eroding ahead of impeachment vote – Twin Cities

Back to top button