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Unions split on federal vaccine mandate, complicating Biden’s push – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-09-12 18:09:00 –

The National Nurses United has praised President Joe Biden’s proposal to require labor vaccinations for businesses with more than 100 employees. The American Federation of Teachers once said that vaccine obligations weren’t necessary, but now they’re accepting it. In Oregon, police and fire unions are urging state workers to block their obligations to mask. The labor movement, as well as the country as a whole, has been torn over vaccine requirements that want to support Biden’s political allies and protect their members from infection. Patricia Campos Medina, Executive Director of the Workers’ Institute at Cornell University, said: “There is the same political division we have now in the union ranks and files.” Video above: Biden has announced that it will wipe out the new vaccine rules. The union is an important part of the Democratic Party, and Biden accepted the union to hone his image of the blue-collar middle class. Opposition to Biden’s own coalition may make it particularly difficult for him to implement the new immunization requirements. Some unions on behalf of federal workers say that such issues, including new workplace requirements and discipline, need to be negotiated at the negotiating table, inoculation among U.S. government workers. I already opposed his push. As a sign of the importance of the matter to the Biden administration, the White House will contact the union president and continue to check in with Labor leaders before Biden announces his new policy on Thursday. An official who insisted on anonymity to discuss his plans said. Biden requires companies with more than 100 workers to give employees shots or test weekly. He will also require government workers and federal contractors to take shots without opt-out of testing. The new requirements have the potential to cover 100 million Americans. Momentum seems to be on the duty side. In a statement released Friday, the AFL-CIO, the body that oversees many of the national unions, praised the mission and Biden’s plans. “The resurrection of COVID-19 requires swift and swift action. We commend President Biden for taking additional steps to end this crisis. Immunize everyone as a step towards stopping the pandemic. We need to do that, “Rizschler, president of the organization, said in a statement. Two weeks ago, AFT mandated office employees to be vaccinated and has become a strong supporter of vaccinated workplaces. “Safety and health have been our northern stars since the pandemic began,” said union president Randi Weingarten. Support for the union’s mission “will bring great cheers to two-thirds of our population and produce hideouts for one-third,” she added. Many employers of workers in the Workers’ District Council of Western Pennsylvania, like hospitals, are beginning to demand vaccinations. Whenever members complain, Philip Ameris, the council’s business manager, tells them that it’s not a union call. Please go to the doctor, “said Amelys. “We strive to keep it non-political …. go to your doctor and ask your doctor what is best for you.” Some of the most fierce opposition is law. I’m from an executive union. In Newark on Thursday, police and fire unions throughout New Jersey protested the mayor’s vaccination obligations outside the city hall. Police unions from Chicago to Richmond oppose their obligations in the city. In Portland, Oregon, a local police union has exempted its members from the city’s vaccination order, and a group of police and firefighters’ unions has sued Governor Kate Brown to block vaccination requirements for state workers. .. Mandatory vaccines at Pennsylvania State University made sense that the strongest resistance from police and firefighters came. “From a political point of view, the more conservative aspect of the labor movement will be the union of police and firefighters,” he said, saying the response to the coronavirus was highly polarized. “Yes, you are a member and yes, you want to get your workplace back to normal, but the identity of being a Republican outweighs many of them.” Secretary General of the National Association of Police Organizations. , Bill Johnson, police officers said they were reacting like most Americans. “Like any other country, we have very strong feelings on both sides,” Johnson said. Still, the police union can see the text on the wall and wants to negotiate all obligations through the collective bargaining process. Johnson said. “From the union’s point of view, there is a feeling that vaccination policy will be almost mandatory,” he said. “I want to sit at the table when discussing implementation,” said Campos Medina, who said forced vaccination was clearly an important public health policy and hoped that the union would eventually accept it. .. She compared it to a ban on indoor smoking, which ranked several unions a few years ago, but it’s a subject that rarely appears at today’s negotiating table. “We will get there,” she said. Like Biden, Wayengarten’s union initially opposed vaccination obligations and said it was a better approach to persuade workers to give them injections. However, AFT reconsidered after the Delta Variant increased the case load this summer to fill the hospital bed. She also believes that almost all unions will eventually unite behind a compulsory position. But she says it will take some time. “Union leadership I’m talking about to know that vaccines are really important,” Weingarten said. “What they are trying to do is balance all these different services and our responsibilities to the members.” __ AP Communications writer Josh Boak of Washington and Marc Levy of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania wrote in this report. Contributed.

The National Nurses United has praised President Joe Biden’s proposal to require labor vaccinations for businesses with more than 100 employees. The American Federation of Teachers once said that vaccine obligations weren’t necessary, but now they’re accepting it. In Oregon, police and fire unions are urging state workers to block mask mandates.

The labor movement, like the whole country, is torn over vaccine requirements. Not only do they want to support Biden’s political allies and protect their members from infection, but they also do not want to trample on the rights of workers.

Patricia Campos Medina, Secretary-General of the Workers’ Institute at Cornell University, said: “The same political disparities we have now exist in union classes and files.”

Video above: Biden announces wipe out new vaccine rules

That split complicates the problem because Biden attempts to put the delta variant under control. The union is an important part of the Democratic Party, and Biden accepted the union to hone his image of the blue-collar middle class. Opposition to Biden’s own coalition may make it particularly difficult for him to implement the new immunization requirements. Some unions on behalf of federal workers say that such issues, including new workplace requirements and discipline, need to be negotiated at the negotiating table, inoculation among the U.S. government’s workforce. I already opposed his push.

As a sign of the importance of this issue to the Biden administration, the White House insisted on anonymity when Biden contacted the union president on Thursday before announcing his new policy and continued to check in with Labor leaders. The government officials who insisted on discussing the plan said future plans.

Biden requires companies with more than 100 workers to give employees shots or test weekly. He will also require government workers and federal contractors to take shots without opt-out of testing. The new requirements have the potential to cover 100 million Americans.

Momentum seems to be on the duty side. In a statement released Friday, the AFL-CIO, the body that oversees many of the national unions, praised the mission and Biden’s plans. “The resurrection of COVID-19 requires swift and swift action. We commend President Biden for taking additional steps to end this crisis. Immunize everyone as a step towards stopping the pandemic. We need to do that, “Rizschler, president of the organization, said in a statement.

Two weeks ago, AFT mandated office employees to be vaccinated and has become a strong supporter of vaccinated workplaces. “Safety and health have been our northern stars since the pandemic began,” said union president Randi Weingarten. Support for the union’s mission “will bring great cheers to two-thirds of our people and produce agita for one-third,” she added.

Still, many Labor leaders are hesitant to step into mission issues. Many employers of workers in the Workers’ District Council of Western Pennsylvania, like hospitals, are beginning to demand vaccinations. Whenever members complain, the council’s business manager, Philip Amelis, tells them that it’s not a union call.

“What we said was’we recommend vaccination of our members’, but what we are telling everyone to do is go to your doctor,” Amelys said. Said. “We strive to keep it non-political …. go to your doctor and ask your doctor what is best for you.”

Some of the most enthusiastic opposition comes from law enforcement unions. In Newark on Thursday, police and fire unions throughout New Jersey protested the mayor’s vaccination obligations outside the city hall. Police unions from Chicago to Richmond oppose their obligations in the city. In Portland, Oregon, a local police union has exempted its members from the city’s vaccination orders, and a group of police and fire unions have sued Governor Kate Brown to block vaccination requirements for state workers.

Simon Hader, a political scientist studying vaccine obligations at Penn State University, said it makes sense that the strongest resistance comes from police and firefighters. “From a political point of view, the more conservative aspect of the labor movement will be the union of police and firefighters,” he said, saying the response to the coronavirus was highly polarized. “Yes, you are a member, and yes, you want to get your workplace back to normal, but your Republican identity goes beyond many of them.”

Bill Johnson, secretary general of the National Association of Police Organizations, said police officers were reacting like most Americans. “Like any other country, both sides have really strong emotions,” Johnson said.

Still, the police union can see the text on the wall and wants to negotiate all obligations through the collective bargaining process, Johnson said. “From the union’s point of view, there is a feeling that vaccination policy will be almost mandatory,” he said. “When we talk about implementation, we want to sit at the table.”

Campos-Medina said compulsory vaccination is clearly an important public health policy and hopes that unions will eventually accept it. She compared it to a ban on indoor smoking, which ranked several unions a few years ago, but it’s a subject that rarely appears at today’s negotiating table. “We get there,” she said.

Weingarten’s union initially opposed the vaccination obligations, like Biden, and said it was a better approach to persuade workers to give injections. However, AFT reconsidered after the Delta variant increased the case load this summer and filled the hospital bed.

She also believes that almost all unions will eventually unite behind a delegated position. But she says it will take some time.

“The union leadership I’m talking about knows that vaccines are really important,” Weingarten said. “What they are trying to do is balance all these different services with our responsibilities to our members.”

__

Associated Press writer Josh Boak of Washington and Marc Levy of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania contributed to this report.

Unions split on federal vaccine mandate, complicating Biden’s push Source link Unions split on federal vaccine mandate, complicating Biden’s push

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