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University of Utah, Korean university develops low-cost sensor

Scientists at the University of Utah and Gyeongsang National University in South Korea have developed an easy-to-use, low-cost bioelectric sensor. The biosensor is built into the garment. This brings benefits beyond convenience and comfort. Soft clothing means better contact with the skin and better signal.

Bioelectric sensors on the skin can be used to measure electrical signals in the body, such as heart activity and muscle contraction. Although it provides valuable information to clinicians, current bioelectric sensor technology can be ineffective, unpleasant, expensive, and difficult to manufacture.

The study is published at APL material.. The sensor measures the electromyogram (EMG) signal that the muscle produces when it contracts. EMG signals are useful for studying muscle fatigue and recovery. They can also be useful in diagnosing and treating neuromuscular disease.

Scientists at the University of Utah and Gyeongsang National University in South Korea have developed an easy-to-use, low-cost bioelectric sensor. The biosensor is built into the garment. This brings benefits beyond convenience and comfort. Soft clothing means better contact with the skin and better signal.

“The signal we measure is the voltage over time,” says author Huanan Zhang. “Every time you move your finger, your body’s potential and your muscle’s potential change. Therefore, you can detect the potential difference.”

Initially, scientists printed the silver paste directly on the cloth. Since silver is conductive, it is a good material for detecting electrical signals. However, it is also toxic and can irritate the skin if exposed for extended periods of time.

To take advantage of the beneficial properties of silver, the team deposited a layer of gold nanoparticles on top of silver. Gold completely encapsulated the silver particles and prevented them from touching the skin. The result is a detector that is conductive and does not irritate the skin. The sensor is cheap because the amount of gold and silver is small.

Scientists tested the performance of biosensors by placing them on the biceps and fingers and monitoring the signals of those muscles performing various exercises.

The sensor is part of the fabric and is designed for long-term use, so it must withstand washing. The team retested the sensor’s performance after multiple washes and found that the performance remained high.

“This work not only designs wearable devices with useful elements, but also provides excellent performance and biocompatibility,” says Zhang.

Fiber2Fashion News Desk (SV)



University of Utah, Korean university develops low-cost sensor

Source link University of Utah, Korean university develops low-cost sensor

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