Pittsburgh

Updated CDC guidance: Don’t travel for Thanksgiving – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2020-11-19 15:11:00 –

Jessica: The COVID-19 case continues to rise in New Hampshire, raising concerns about what will happen on holidays when people cross the country. Thanksgiving is a week away, and many are seeking advice when it comes to expanding their families to celebrate and whether it’s a good idea to travel within New England. To answer some of these questions, we are joining by DR. Benjamin talks about staying safe. Thank you for your participation. Can you give me the latest information about where the COVID stands? In this month’s pandemic, 30% of all COVID cases occurred. DR. Chan: Most states are experiencing new surges, including New Hampshire. We would like to return to mid-September to see an increase in infections, but only in the last few weeks we saw a dramatic increase in infections. Today, the entire state is experiencing a high level of community expansion. It’s not just the number of infections, people are seeing hospitalization with an increase in the number of dying people, the test positive rate is declining. All of these show increased risk within our community. Jessica: What are your health and safety recommendations for Thanksgiving celebrations, travel, and having relatives? DR. Chan: Travel, social and family gatherings increase the risk of getting infected and getting COVID-19. It can put families, individuals and communities at risk for COVID-19. For this reason, the New Hampshire Public Health Center and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention encourage people to make difficult sacrifices, choose to celebrate Thanksgiving, and join others from their immediate homes. Choose to travel to. It is only within New Hampshire and New England, as the act of traveling intentionally increases the risk of COVID-19. It’s not the same if there is no alternative way for people to celebrate, such as through video chat. These are some of the difficult choices we have to make. Jessica: If people decide to get together and see others physically, is there a way they can do it safely? DR. Chan: We understand that connections with family and friends are important to someone’s emotional and mental health, but they travel and gather with people outside their homes. If you choose, we want people to be safe and minimize risk. First, when people are traveling, if they are traveling outside the state, you need to pay attention to guidance and restrictions in other states, such as masks and test requirements. You should avoid public transportation such as buses, planes and trains, minimize exposure to other public facilities, and wear a face mask when in public areas. At the rally, the same principles apply what we are talking about on an ongoing basis each week. If your hosts can get together outdoors and are around other people, and you want to keep a distance of 6 feet, make the meeting area smaller and the more people there are, the higher the risk. The same principles apply. We have been asked and used for test and contest help. And it can be seen in one layer of protection. People can expect to be tested within a few days before traveling and within a few days after returning home. This is a step towards preventing the risk of COVID-19, but it is important to keep in mind that it is a single snapshot and does not eliminate the risk of COVID-19. Therefore, it is important to keep people at a social distance and face the use of masks. Jessica: T

Updated CDC Guidance: Don’t Travel for Thanksgiving


During the runaway coronavirus, the top public health agencies in the United States begged Americans on Thursday not to travel for Thanksgiving or spend vacations with people outside their families. This was part of the government’s most robust guidance to date on reductions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued recommendations just one week before Thanksgiving, during a period of nationwide surge in infectious disease, hospitalization, and death diagnoses. In many areas, the combination of sick patients and sick health care workers who fill the beds is putting pressure on the healthcare system. Dr. Erin Sauber Schatz of the CDC has cited more than one million new cases in the United States in the past week. The reason for the new guidelines. “The safest way to celebrate this year’s Thanksgiving, is home with your household of people,” she said.PCEtLSBzdGFydCBBUCBlbWJlZCAtLT4KCjxpZnJhbWUgdGl0bGU9Ik5ldyBkYWlseSBDT1ZJRC0xOSBjYXNlcyIgYXJpYS1sYWJlbD0iTWFwIiBpZD0iZGF0YXdyYXBwZXItY2hhcnQtT3c3NHQiIHNyYz0iaHR0cHM6Ly9pbnRlcmFjdGl2ZXMuYXAub3JnL2VtYmVkcy9Pdzc0dC8yMi8iIHNjcm9sbGluZz0ibm8iIHdpZHRoPSIxMDAlIiBzdHlsZT0iYm9yZGVyOm5vbmUiIGhlaWdodD0iNTMxIj48L2lmcmFtZT48c2NyaXB0IHR5cGU9InRleHQvamF2YXNjcmlwdCI + IWZ1bmN0aW9uKCl7InVzZSBzdHJpY3QiO3dpbmRvdy5hZGRFdmVudExpc3RlbmVyKCJtZXNzYWdlIiwoZnVuY3Rpb24oYSl7aWYodm9pZCAwIT09YS5kYXRhWyJkYXRhd3JhcHBlci1oZWlnaHQiXSlmb3IodmFyIGUgaW4gYS5kYXRhWyJkYXRhd3JhcHBlci1oZWlnaHQiXSl7dmFyIHQ9ZG9jdW1lbnQuZ2V0RWxlbWVudEJ5SWQoImRhdGF3cm of CDC Thanksgiving guidelines FwcGVyLWNoYXJ0LSIrZSl8fGRvY3VtZW50LnF1ZXJ5U2VsZWN0b3IoImlmcmFtZVtzcmMqPSciK2UrIiddIik7dCYmKHQuc3R5bGUuaGVpZ2h0PWEuZGF0YVsiZGF0YXdyYXBwZXItaGVpZ2h0Il1bZV0rInB4Iil9fSkpfSgpOzwvc2NyaXB0PgoKPCEtLSBlbmQgQVAgZW1iZWQgLS0 + A complete breakdown is here.If Family members can find the CDC decided to include college students, military personnel and others for turkey stuffing that the host recommends taking additional precautions: unless there is a gathering outdoors Nari Not possible. Place the mask 6 feet away and only one person will serve the meal. Whether Americans pay attention to warnings is another matter. The deadly resurrection of the virus is due to pandemic malaise, or those who are tired of masks and other precautions. There has also been a surge since last summer’s Memorial Day and July 4, despite dull warnings from health officials. In the United States, more than 11 million infectious diseases have been diagnosed and more than 250,000 have died from the coronavirus. CDC scientists believe that about 40% of infected people have no obvious symptoms, but can still spread the virus. If you are thinking of traveling for Thanksgiving, the CDC recommends that you take the following questions into consideration. If the answer to your question is yes, the CDC advises you not to travel. Is you, someone in your family, or anyone you visit at a very high risk of getting sick from COVID-19? Community or your destination? Check the CDC COVID data tracker for the latest number of cases. Are your area or destination hospital overwhelmed by patients with COVID-19? Check the state and local public health department websites to find out. Are there any requirements or restrictions for travelers at home or at their destination? Please check state and region requirements before traveling. Did you or the person you are visiting come into close contact with someone you did not live with 14 days before your trip? Does your plan include a trip by bus, train, or plane? Is it difficult to be 6 feet away? Are you traveling with someone you don’t live with?

As the coronavirus went wild, the top public health agencies in the United States begged Americans on Thursday not to travel for Thanksgiving or spend vacations with people outside their families.

This was part of the most solid guidance ever from the government on reducing traditional rallies to combat outbreaks.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued recommendations just one week before Thanksgiving, when diagnosed infectious diseases, hospitalizations and deaths were on the rise nationwide. In many areas, the combination of sick patients who fill their beds with health care workers who get sick themselves is putting pressure on the healthcare system.

CDC’s Dr. Erin Sauber-Schatz cited more than one million new cases in the United States in the past week as the reason for the new guidance.

“The safest way to celebrate Thanksgiving this year is to stay home with the people of your family,” she said.

A complete breakdown of the CDC Thanksgiving guidelines can be found here.

The CDC recommends that organizers take additional precautions if their families decide to include returning college students, military personnel, etc. in turkeys and stuffing. Serve food.

Whether Americans pay attention to warnings is another matter. The deadly resurrection of the virus is due to pandemic malaise, or those who are tired of masks and other precautions. And, despite dull warnings from health officials, there was a surge last summer after Memorial Day and July 4.

In the United States, more than 11 million people have been diagnosed with coronavirus infections and more than 250,000 have died. CDC scientists believe that about 40% of infected people have no obvious symptoms, but can still spread the virus.

The CDC recommends that you consider the following questions if you are considering traveling for Thanksgiving. If the answer to your question is yes, the CDC advises you not to travel.

  • Are you, someone in your family, or someone you visit at very high risk of getting sick from COVID-19?
  • Are there many or increasing cases in your community or destination? Check the CDC COVID data tracker for the latest number of cases.
  • Are your local or destination hospitals overwhelmed by patients infected with COVID-19? Check the state and local public health department websites to find out.
  • Are there any requirements or restrictions for travelers in your home or destination? Please check state and region requirements before traveling.
  • During the 14 days before the trip, did you or the people you visit have close contact with people they do not live in?
  • Can your plan include traveling by bus, train, or plane, making it difficult to stay 6 feet away?
  • Are you traveling with someone you don’t live with?

Updated CDC guidance: Don’t travel for Thanksgiving Source link Updated CDC guidance: Don’t travel for Thanksgiving

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