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US hospitals feel pressure of rising COVID-19 cases – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-07-16 19:32:00 –

The revival of COVID-19 across the United States is putting pressure on busy hospitals to catch up with surgery and other procedures that were put on hold during the pandemic. Highly contagious delta variants have spread rapidly, with US cases increasing by about 70% last week, hospitalizations increasing by about 36%, and deaths increasing by 26%, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Hospitals report record or near-record numbers of patients. But even for those who don’t, this pandemic round has proven to be tougher in some respects, hospitals and health officials said. American College President Mark Rosenberg says the staff is exhausted and it can be difficult to find a traveling nurse to raise the rank. Of the emergency doctor. “And I want to go back to another mission over and over again. After all, I just don’t want to do it.” Also, many hospitals have been busy processing the unprocessed portion of their cancer screening even before the surge began. I did. According to health care leaders, surgery and other procedures postponed during the winter surge were postponed to free up space and staff. He is one of the leaders of the Global Health Security Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. Currently, some hospitals may have to postpone care that is not related to COVID-19 again, which may endanger that possibility. Patient Health Impacts Dr. Laura Makarov, Senior Vice President of Prevention and Early Detection of the American Cancer Society, said cancer screening declined during development and has not yet returned to normal levels in many communities. Stated. She warned that due to delayed screening, cancer could be detected at a more advanced stage of the disease. Deaths from COVID-19 and newly identified infectious diseases across the United States are dramatically lower than in winter. But for the first time since then, cases have increased in all 50 states. And the country’s vaccination drive slowed down to crawl, with only about 48% of the population fully protected. CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said the outbreak in the United States is dead in almost every unhospitalized and unvaccinated person. One of the country’s most overwhelming regions is Springfield, Missouri. Here, public health officials asked the state this week to convert a dormitory, hotel, or another large space to treat less severe COVID-19 patients into two hospitals in the city. Mercy Springfield and Cox South are expected to have a seven-fold increase in coronavirus cases since late May, Mercy will treat a high number of pandemics, and Cox will break his own record next week. In Florida, UF Health Jacksonville talked about setting up a tent in the parking lot to help overflow after the number of COVID-19 inpatients has doubled to 77 in the past few weeks. Chad Nielsen, head of infection prevention, said the hospital expects to exceed January’s high of 125 COVID-19 inpatients in the coming weeks. Before rising, the hospital began pushing to bring back patients who had delayed care during a pandemic. Nielsen said he is currently discussing the cancellation process. “Sorry, too many COVID patients are rarely vaccinated and need to delay hip surgery or procedures,” he said. The Augusta University Medical Center in Georgia is “rupturing at the seams” as it handles postponed medical procedures due to a pandemic and addresses the surge in respiratory illness that normally occurs in winter, the chief said. Medical officer Dr. Phillip Coule said. Hospitalization with COVID-19 has also begun to infect up to about 8-10 patients, starting at lows once or twice daily. The numbers are still well below the January 145 peak, but Chur said he is watching the situation closely. “In a way, it feels much better than it used to be,” the staff said. It is safer thanks to vaccination. “I’m worried if I would otherwise have to postpone daily care again to see what the consequences would be.” In California, even vaccinated people, Los Angeles County again need a mask indoors. .. In the last three weeks, the number of cases of COVID-19 has doubled to more than 400 across 36 California hospitals in Kaiser Permanente. Dr. Stephen Parody, who helped develop a plan for Kaiser Permanente’s hospital surge, said he was confident that he could handle the influx. Note that the total is still less than 20% of the January peak. But he said the hospital was already busy with people appearing in the emergency room for serious illnesses than if the problem was discovered earlier. “At some point, the illness isn’t waiting for us,” he said. “The ability to postpone additional care if you have already postponed it for a year, a year and a half is not just an acceptable option.”

The US Open’s resurgence of COVID-19 is putting pressure on busy hospitals to keep up with the surgery and other procedures put on hold during the pandemic.

Due to the rapid spread of highly contagious delta mutants, US cases increased by about 70% last week, hospitalizations increased by about 36%, and mortality increased by 26%, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Said on Friday.

Some hospitals report record or near record numbers of patients. But even for those who don’t, this pandemic round has proven to be tougher in some respects, hospitals and health officials said. The staff is exhausted and it can be difficult to find a traveling nurse to raise the rank.

“I really think it’s a war, and how long can I stay on the front lines,” said Dr. Mark Rosenberg of the American College of Emergency Medicine. “And how many times do you want to go back on a different mission tour? After all, you just don’t want to do that.”

Also, according to health care leaders, many hospitals have been busy before the surge began, handling the untreated portion of cancer screening, surgery and other procedures postponed during the winter surge, space and staff. Released.

Dr. James Roller, one of the leaders of the Global Health Security Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, said:

Currently, a concern in some hospitals is that care that is not related to COVID-19 may have to be postponed again, jeopardizing the potential health consequences of the patient.

Dr. Laura Makarov, senior vice president of prevention and early detection of the American Cancer Society, said cancer screening declined during the outbreak and has not yet returned to normal levels in many communities. She warned that delayed screening could result in cancer being detected at a more advanced stage of the disease.

Deaths from COVID-19 and newly identified infectious diseases across the United States are dramatically lower than during the winter months. But for the first time since then, cases have increased in all 50 states. And the country’s vaccination drive has slowed down to crawl, with only about 48% of the population fully protected.

Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the CDC, warned that the outbreak in the United States is becoming a “unvaccinated pandemic.” This is because almost all hospitalizations and deaths are among non-immune people.

One of the country’s most overwhelming regions is Springfield, Missouri, where public health officials have opened a dormitory, hotel, or another large space in the state this week to treat less serious COVID-19 patients. Requested to convert to two hospitals in the city. You can focus on the most sick people.

Mercy Springfield and Cox South have seen a seven-fold increase in coronavirus cases since late May, Mercy is treating a pandemic, and Cox is expected to break its own record next week.

In Florida, UF Health Jacksonville is discussing setting up a tent in the parking lot to help overflow after the number of COVID-19 inpatients has doubled to 77 in the past few weeks. Chad Nielsen, head of infection prevention, said the hospital expects to exceed January’s high of 125 COVID-19 inpatients in the coming weeks.

Before rising, the hospital began pushing to bring back patients who had delayed care during a pandemic. Nielsen said he is currently discussing the cancellation process.

“Sorry, too many COVID patients are rarely vaccinated and need to delay hip surgery or procedures,” he said.

The Augusta University Medical Center in Georgia is “rupturing at the seams” as it handles postponed medical procedures due to a pandemic and addresses the surge in respiratory illness that normally occurs in winter, the chief said. Medical officer Dr. Phillip Coule said.

Hospitalization with COVID-19 has also begun to infect up to about 8-10 patients, starting at lows once or twice daily. The numbers are still well below the January 145 peak, but Chur said he is watching the situation closely.

“In a way, we feel much better than before,” he said, saying the staff are safer thanks to vaccination. “Otherwise, I’m worried about whether I’ll have to postpone routine care again to see what the consequences will be.”

In California, Los Angeles County again needs a mask indoors, even for vaccinated people. Over the past three weeks, the number of cases of COVID-19 has doubled across 36 California hospitals in Kaiser Permanente to over 400.

Dr. Stephen Parody, who helped develop a hospital surge plan for Kaiser Permanente, said he was confident that he could handle the influx, and said the total was still less than 20% of the January peak.

But he said the hospital was already busy with people appearing in the emergency room for serious illnesses than if the problem was discovered earlier.

“At some point, the illness isn’t waiting for us,” he said. “The ability to postpone additional care if you have already postponed it for a year, a year and a half is not just an acceptable option.”

US hospitals feel pressure of rising COVID-19 cases Source link US hospitals feel pressure of rising COVID-19 cases

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