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US researchers develop new indigo dyeing technology

Researchers at the University of Georgia in the United States have developed a new indigo dyeing technique that they claim is an environmentally friendly alternative to the current method. This technology reduces the amount of water used and eliminates toxic chemicals that are harmful to the environment in the dyeing process. Streamline the process and ensure more colors than traditional methods.

However, indigo is not water soluble and must be reduced with toxic chemicals before it can be used to dye clothing. The denim industry uses over 45,000 tonnes of synthetic indigo annually, with over 84,000 tonnes of hydrosulfite sodium and 53,000 tonnes of lye as reducing agents.

Published in the journal Green chemistryThe new dyeing method uses natural indigo (synthesis can also be used in a streamlined process), completely eliminating the use of harmful chemicals used in traditional methods.

Researchers at the University of Georgia in the United States have developed a new indigo dyeing technique that they claim is an environmentally friendly alternative to the current method. This technology reduces the amount of water used and eliminates toxic chemicals that are harmful to the environment in the dyeing process. Streamline the process and ensure more colors than traditional methods.

Also, to ensure 90% or more of the color, you only need to apply indigo once, which greatly reduces the amount of water required to dye the fabric. Traditional methods require up to 8 immersions in the dye solution, which can only ensure 70% to 80%.

The new method does not sacrifice comfort, but keeps the fabric thickness, weight gain and flexibility at about the same level. According to a press release from the university, a streamlined process saves workers time and energy by eliminating the need for multiple dips and oxidation time between each dip.

“This process does not reduce indigo. You do not dissolve it. You just mix it with nanocellulose fibril and attach it to the surface of the textile. Also, depending on the amount of indigo particles added to the mixture, the shade of blue “Can be changed,” said Sergie Minco, the corresponding author of this study and a professor of textile and polymer science at the Family and Consumer Sciences University of Georgia Electric Power.

Nanocellulose is a relatively recent product made from wood pulp commonly used in the paper industry. The new technology mixes indigo particles with nanofibers, deposits them on the surface of the textile, and essentially “glues” the color in place.

New technologies still need to be commercialized, but they are a viable option to make the denim industry more sustainable.

This study is part of a PhD study by Smriti Rai, a PhD candidate in the Textiles, Merchandising and Interiors departments. The department’s professor, Suraj Sharma, and the department’s materials researcher, Raha Saremi, were co-authors of the study.

Fiber2Fashion News Desk (DS)



US researchers develop new indigo dyeing technology

Source link US researchers develop new indigo dyeing technology

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