Pittsburgh

‘We will live with the scars’ forever – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-09-06 08:44:00 –

Twenty years later, Jack Grandcolas still remembers waking up at 7:03 that morning. He looked at the clock, and then an image of the sky came out of his eye-catching window — a fleeting vision of an angel appearing to rise. He didn’t know it yet, but it was a moment when his life changed. At 10:03 am nationwide, United Airlines Flight 93 had just crashed into Pennsylvania Field. His wife, Lauren, should not have been on board. That flight. So when he turned on the TV and saw the chilling scene unfolding on September 11, 2001, he wasn’t worried about her. Then he saw the flashing lights on his answering machine. Lauren left two messages that morning when he was sleeping with the phone ringing off in his bedroom. First, there was good news that she was on a previous flight from her New Jersey home to San Francisco. Then she called from the plane. “There was a bit of a problem,” his wife said, but she was “comfortable for now.” Grandcolas recalls that she didn’t say she would call back. She said. “I love you more than anything else. I just know it. Say I love my family too. Goodbye Honey.” “At that moment I watched TV and Pennsylvania There was a smoldering hole in the ground. I was told it was United Airlines Flight 93, “said 58-year-old Grancolas. Lauren was 38 years old and was pregnant with her first child for three months. She traveled east to attend her grandmother’s funeral in New Jersey and stayed for a few more days to announce her pregnancy. “It’s good news to lift the spirit of parents and sisters after burying their grandmother,” Grandcolas said. Flight 93 It was the fourth and last plane hijacked on September 11 by four al-Qaeda terrorists on a suicide mission aimed at the Capitol in Washington, DC. Passengers and crew used seatback phones to call loved ones and authorities and learned of the first two Attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, DC Their hijacking is broader Realizing that they were part of the attack, they voted to counterattack and gain control of the plane. It was a heroic act. “What they did was amazingly dramatic,” said Grancolas. It was “an act of selfless love to overcome hatred.” The outline of the plan was given by phone and recorded on a voice recorder in the cockpit. ilies never know the specific role their loved ones played. Grandcolas believes Lauren was involved. Lauren is an avid advertising sales consultant with a big heart and a passion for life, and wanted to be able to help people in crisis, so he was athletic, outgoing, and trained as an EMT. received. I sit there vaguely, “he said. He imagines she participates in a plan for how to take control of the plane, gathers information, and knows she’s running out of time. “She would have tapped the watch and said,’We have to make something faster.'” For years, Grancolas bristled with the words “9/11 Anniversary.” Was there. Anniversary is a celebration, but the 20th anniversary is an important anniversary, Grancolas said, adding that he will be traveling to Pennsylvania for the first time since 2003 to visit the National Monument on Flight 93. I stopped at the crash site in Pennsylvania and felt the pain was too great. Instead, in the years that followed, he spent September 11th doing what Lauren liked. For example, I rode a bicycle or took a quiet walk on the beach. “We will live the rest of our lives with scars,” he said in an interview near his home in Pebble Beach, Pennsylvania. Grancola suffered from depression and the guilt of survivors in the aftermath of the tragedy. He saw Lauren’s message from the plane and reassured him and her family, saying, “Tell us that she’s okay with what’s happening.” The unrealistic image he saw in the sky on the morning of September 11 took on a new meaning when he was healed. He heard her voice during the struggle and told him to get up and stay alive in his life. Gran Cholas eventually remarried and moved from a house he and Lauren bought in San Rafael, California. Today he is half retired from his career as an advertising executive. He writes a book about the process of sadness that is a homage to his foetation. It will be published in April when the child turns 20. At the 20th anniversary, Gran Chorus sees it in stark contrast to the division that plagues America today, since 9/11. We look back on how the countries got together. “This country has been united from sea to shining sea, and today, maybe now, is a good time to break the division,” he said.

Twenty years later, Jack Grandcolas still remembers waking up at 7:03 that morning. He looked at the clock, and then an image of the sky came out of his eye-catching window — a fleeting vision of an angel appearing to rise. He didn’t know it yet, but it was a moment when his life changed.

United Airlines Flight 93 crashed into Pennsylvania Field at 10:03 am nationwide.

His wife, Lauren, couldn’t have boarded the plane. So when he turned on the TV and saw the chilling scene unfolding on September 11, 2001, he wasn’t worried about her. Then he saw the flashing lights on his answering machine.

Lauren was sleeping in the bedroom with a phone ringing that morning, leaving two messages. First, there was good news that she was on a previous flight from her New Jersey home to San Francisco. Then she called from the plane. “There was a bit of a problem,” his wife said, but she was “comfortable for now.” Grandcolas recalls that she didn’t say she would call back. She said. “I love you more than anything else. I just know it. Say I love my family too. Goodbye Honey.”

“At that moment I watched TV and there was a smoldering hole in the ground in Pennsylvania. I was told it was United Airlines Flight 93,” said 58-year-old Gran Chorus.

All 44 people on board were killed. Lauren was 38 years old and was pregnant with her first child for three months. She traveled east to attend her grandmother’s funeral in New Jersey and stayed for a few more days to announce her pregnancy. “It’s a little good news to lift the spirit of parents and sisters after burying their grandmother,” Grancolas said.

Flight 93 was the fourth and last plane hijacked by four al-Qaeda terrorists on a suicide mission targeting the Capitol in Washington, DC on September 11. Passengers and crew used seatback phones to call loved ones and authorities, and the first two attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, DC were one of the more widespread hijacking attacks. Realizing that it was a club, he voted to fight back and gain control of the plane. It was a heroic act that saved countless lives.

“What they did was amazingly dramatic,” said Grandcolas. It was “an act of selfless love to overcome hatred.”

The outline of the plan was telephoned and recorded in the cockpit voice recorder, but many families never know the specific role played by their loved ones.

Gran Chorus believes Lauren was involved. Lauren is an avid advertising sales consultant with a big heart and a passion for life, and wanted to be able to help people in crisis, so he was athletic, outgoing, and trained as an EMT. received.

“Lauren was the performer, she wasn’t going to sit vaguely there,” he said. He imagines she participates in a plan for how to take control of the plane, gathers information, and knows she’s running out of time. “She would have tapped the watch and said,’We have to make something faster.'”

For years, Grandcolas became bristle with the word “9/11 Anniversary”. Anniversary is a celebration. However, Grandcolas said the 20th anniversary is an important anniversary, adding that he plans to travel to Pennsylvania for the first time since 2003 to visit the National Monument on Flight 93.

Grancola attended the first two annual monuments at the Pennsylvania crash site and then stopped. Instead, in the years that followed, he spent September 11th doing what Lauren liked. For example, I rode a bicycle or took a quiet walk on the beach.

“Every year, it’s a real punch,” he said in an interview near his home in Pebble Beach, California.

Grancola suffered from depression and the Survivor Guilt in the aftermath of the tragedy. With the help of therapy, he sees Lauren’s message from the plane and intends to reassure him and her family and “inform us that there is nothing wrong with what she is doing”. I came to see you. The unrealistic image he saw in the sky on the morning of September 11 took on a new meaning when he was healed. To stand up and keep his life alive.

Gran Cholas eventually remarried and moved from a house he and Lauren bought in San Rafael, California. Today he is half retired from his career as an advertising executive. He writes a book about the process of sadness that is a homage to his foetation. Published in April when the child is 20 years old.

Grand Chorus, celebrating its 20th anniversary, looks back on how the country has come together since 9/11. This is in stark contrast to the division that plagues America today.

“This country has been united from sea to shining sea, and today, maybe now, is a good time to break the division,” he said.

‘We will live with the scars’ forever Source link ‘We will live with the scars’ forever

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