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Well-known Utah slackliners take credit for dismantling infamous monolith – Kansas City, Missouri

Kansas City, Missouri 2020-12-02 08:56:16 –

Two well-known Utah slacklining players have admitted to dismantling the infamous “Monolith,” which has become internationally renowned since it was discovered last week.

Andy Ruiz of Moab, Utah, said in a Facebook post on Tuesday that he was part of a group that knocked down the monolith last week. He also confirmed his involvement in texting with the Salt Lake Tribune.

“On the night of November 27, 2020, around 8:30 pm — our team has removed Utamonoris,” Lewis wrote in a Facebook post. “At this time, no other information, answers or insights are included.”

Lewis’ Facebook post was linked to a YouTube video containing the deleted photo.

Fellow slackliner Sylvain Christensen also said he was part of a group that dismantled the landmark. Christensen posted an Instagram containing a video of the removal and issued a long statement to Scripps Station KSTU in Salt Lake City stating that the area was not physically prepared for many visitors.

“We have removed Utamonoris because there are clear precedents for sharing and standardizing the use of public land, natural wildlife, native plants, freshwater sources, and human influence on them. The mystery is This time around, I want to get hooked and use it to unite the people behind the real problem here-we’re losing public land-this doesn’t help, “Kristensen said. Said. “Let’s be clear. The dismantling of Utamonoris is tragic — and if you think we’re proud, we’re not. We’re disappointed.”

“Furthermore, we were too late. We want to make it clear that we are supporting art and artists, but legality and ethics set standards, especially here in the desert, and absolutely in adventure. Defined. The ethical failure of a 24-year-old artist. ”The sandstone-equal Gaudi by the construction of Utamonoris was not even close to the damage caused by the sensationalism of the Internet and the subsequent reaction from the world. “

The monolith found on a helicopter elevated road in late November was found approximately 800 meters from a high-clearance 4×4 dirt road near the Canyonlands Needles area, southeast of Moab.

On Monday, Colorado-based photographer Ross Berners told KSTU that he saw a monolith fall on Friday night.

Berners said a group of four stood up while he and his friends were taking pictures, pushing up the monolith, disassembling it, and then loading it into a wheelbarrow and leaving.

Mr Berners said the group told him and his friends, “This is why you don’t leave trash in the desert,” and to his friends, “I leave no trace.”

The next morning, Berners saw dozens of vehicles (including vehicles not equipped to handle rough road conditions) gather in the area as people trampled on the brush to find the monolith. I explained that I saw it. He said some of them were wandering in the wrong canyon in search of a monument.

It was at that moment that Berners said he understood why the group withdrew the monolith, and he agreed with the move.

Read the full text of Christensen below.

“We have removed Utamonoris because there are clear precedents for sharing and standardizing the use of public land, natural wildlife, native plants, freshwater sources, and human influence on them. The mystery is This time around, we’re crazy and want to use it to unite the people behind the real problem here-we’re losing public land-something like this doesn’t help.

Let’s be clear. The dismantling of Utamonoris is tragic — and if you think we are proud — we are not. I was disappointed. Moreover, it was too late. We want to make it clear that we support art and artists, but legality and ethics define the standards that are absolutely so, especially here in the desert and in adventure. The artist’s ethical failure to the sandstone 24 “equilateral triangle Gaudi by the construction of Utamonoris was not even close to the damage caused by Internet sensationalism and subsequent reactions from the world.

This land was not physically prepared for migration (especially during a pandemic).

People arrive by car, bus, van, helicopter, plane, train, motorcycle, electric bike and don’t even have a parking lot. There is no bathroom — and yes, pooping in the desert is a misdemeanor. There were many. There are no marked trails, trash cans, and user group areas. There is no designated campsite. All users of public land must be aware of the importance and relevance of this information and the laws associated with it. If so, anyone who goes out and shoots a monolith and monetizes it without properly permitting land use will know that it is also a crime. “

This story was originally published by Lauren Stein Brescher at KSTU in Salt Lake City.



Well-known Utah slackliners take credit for dismantling infamous monolith Source link Well-known Utah slackliners take credit for dismantling infamous monolith

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