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What the pet coronavirus tells us about the future of covid-19

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Pet dogs are far less threatened by SARS-CoV-2 than their own coronavirus

Plain Picture / Miriam Thaler

Pet report Cat And Dog catches covid-19 Mounted by the owner. For virologist Gary Whitaker, these are not surprising. For the past year, he has investigated cats brought from a hospital in the New York Elders Church on the wealthy Upper East Side of Manhattan to a veterinary hospital just around the corner. His unpublished findings. It suggests that about 15-20% of pet cats in the area have antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes covid-19. “Cats are easily exposed,” says Whittaker. But like infected dogs, most of them are fine. “The mystery is that cats deal fairly well, but they can’t deal with their coronavirus.”

It is alarming to consider that SARS-CoV-2 can infect pets. However, most people do not know that cats are infected with their own coronavirus. Coronavirus usually infects a variety of livestock, including dogs, pigs, cows and chickens. However, while SARS-CoV-2 is probably the most scrutinized virus to date, little attention has been paid to other coronaviruses.

This is missed because veterinary virologists have been studying viruses for decades. Linda Saif, a veterinary coronavirus expert at The Ohio State University, said, “Animal coronaviruses can tell us a lot about cross-species transmission, etiology, immunity, and vaccines. This information is SARS-CoV-. It can be very valuable information as it tries to figure out where 2 came from and where it came from …

What the pet coronavirus tells us about the future of covid-19

Source link What the pet coronavirus tells us about the future of covid-19

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