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What to Know About Newsom’s Big Climate Plan

And she said that the governor’s announcement lacked urgency for protecting vulnerable communities.

“We urge our state’s leadership to move more quickly on identifying how our transition from a fossil-fuel-based economy will align with an equitable one,” she said, referring to the order’s plan to build a carbon-neutral California economy. “We look forward to working with the administration to center frontline communities and workers to ensure that they benefit from critically needed health and economic benefits.”

[Read more from 2018 about the state’s fight with the Trump administration over tailpipe emissions.]

Oil and gas industry representatives criticized the order as job-killing and practically unfeasible.

Cathy Reheis-Boyd, president of the Western States Petroleum Association, said she believed the governor’s ambitious plan did not include enough information about how the state would pay to build up infrastructure for electric vehicles, nor did it account for how expensive gas would become for people who can’t afford to buy a new electric car.

“I don’t see where A plus B equals C,” she said.

As for the transition of workers out of oil and gas production into green jobs, she said there needed to be a real discussion about relative pay.

“We don’t just have jobs, we have careers,” she said.

And then, there’s the fact that vehicle-emissions regulations have been at the center of one of many long-running fights between the Trump administration and California.

Mary Nichols, the chairwoman of the California Air Resources Board, said she expected the state to be taken to court over the regulations. “We’ll get there eventually,” she said on Wednesday at the news conference.

Paul Cort, a lawyer with the environmental group Earthjustice, said that in any case, the governor’s move sent a strong signal.

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