Lexington-Fayette

What you need to know about coronavirus mutants – Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky

Lexington-Fayette, Kentucky 2021-01-14 15:11:05 –

Headings for variants of COVID-19 can be horrifying. So we wanted to delve into exactly what was unusual and what wasn’t, or what we were concerned about.

Dr. Carlos Del Rio of the Infectious Diseases Society of America states that mutations in these types of viruses are normal and are now more common as infections are out of control.

“Respiratory viruses, especially RNA viruses, tend to mutate. They tend to change all the time and do this when they are breeding,” says Del Rio. “And the reason we are seeing so many changes now is that there are so many transmissions and so many propagations of the virus.”

At least one of the recently identified variants can be infected more easily. This is one of the concerns, as more people are infected and more people die.

Del Rio says that under normal circumstances, one person infected with the coronavirus infects 2.5 people. One new variant increases the infection rate to 2.9, which may sound less, but at the end of 10 cycles, the number of infected people is only 9,000 with traditional COVID. Whereas it was, it was 42,00 for the mutated COVID-19. -19.

“My advice to people is, if you’re worried about mutations, or if you’re worried about dispersal, it’s the best way to wear a mask, stay socially distant, and stop the infection. We need to stop the infection because it is the only way to actually stop it, “says Del Rio.

No one has been found to get sick with the COVID-19 variant. They may be detected through tests, but the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warns that some tests are not very good at detecting variants.

Fortunately, treatments and vaccines are effective against the COVID-19 variant, with the exception of one South African variant, where antibody treatment has so far been less effective.

The main point of the variant is that we are all involved in reducing infections. This is the best way to prevent even more mutations.



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