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U.S. Black Money Fund Spends Millions To Support Republican Attorney General | Republican Party

Since 2020, an influential group of 28 Republican Attorneys General has made huge profits from at least $9.5 million from the Concord Fund, public records have revealed.

The Concord Fund was the largest contributor to the Republican Association of Attorneys General (raga) in 2022 and the two years before, and boasts strong ties to Federalist Association co-president Leonard Leo. Leo helped Donald Trump elect three conservative Supreme Court justices and is now spearheading a dark financial network that secured $1.6 billion from one donor.

Since its founding in 1999, Raga has raised and spent tens of millions of dollars to help elect Republican Attorneys General, including many that have filed lawsuits in favor of corporations, but the growing role of the underground. has been criticized by watchdog groups and other critics. Funding and special interest industry funding. Many raga members It has fought legal battles against climate change regulations and other business regulations.

Other major donors to the 2022 ragga include a division of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, energy giant Coke Industries and tobacco giant Altria, according to the liberal research group Center for Media and Democracy (CMD). are mentioned.

Raga members have been criticized as “”.pay play‘ is an action to take action to support business interests that help fund a group of Attorneys General, including fossil fuel companies, to oppose climate change regulations. Additionally, amid President Trump’s fight to prevent Joe Biden from taking office, an affiliate, the Rule of Law Defense Fund, sent 150,000 robocalls to increase attendance at President Trump’s Jan. 6 rally. The dollar spent also raised Mr. Raga’s strong concerns. These robocalls urged “patriots” to join rallies and “call on Congress to march to the Capitol and stop stealing.”

Ahead of the Trump rally, in late 2020, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, with the backing of 17 Attorneys General Raga, passed an emergency motion to the Supreme Court to overturn Joe Biden’s victories in four states. , but the High Court quickly dismissed this legal strategy.

Former Republican Idaho Attorney General Jim Jones told The Guardian that he was disappointed with Paxton’s legal challenge to the 2020 election, calling it “the height of irresponsibility.” They had no facts or laws. “

Jones spoke about the raga members and their focus: “They have become political operatives, not state people, to protect the rule of law. “

Raga “seems to be focused on the issue of culture wars and the protection of industries such as fossil fuels and tobacco that have a negative impact on the health of Americans,” Jones added.

Democratic Senator Sheldon Whitehouse has also emerged as a leading critic of the growing black money backing Lagga and the legal aid many Attorneys General Lagga is giving to fossil fuel companies and other special interest groups. there is

“The danger here is that [AG] A firm purportedly set up for the public interest has become a private special interest law firm,” former Rhode Island Attorney General Whitehouse told The Guardian.

The White House point was highlighted in 2021 when Mr. Paxton and 19 other state attorneys general filed a lawsuit seeking to block the Environmental Protection Agency from regulating power plants’ carbon emissions. The legal battle culminated in a Supreme Court ruling last year that upheld the EPA’s authority to regulate these emissions under the Clean Air Act, but limited in scope and pleasing the interests of coal companies. rice field.

Likewise, many raga members are participating in another growing legal battlefield over fossil fuel interests. Earlier this year, 25 Republican attorneys general, including Mr. Paxton, sued the Labor Department over new rules that would give retirement plan sponsors more room to consider environmental, social and governance issues when investing. A press release from Mr. Paxton’s office in January falsely claimed that labor rules favored Mr. Paxton’s wishes. Called an “awakened” investmentExceed retirement savings.

Besides Paxton, some of the most aggressive supporters of Raga’s fossil fuel interests include the attorneys general of South Carolina, Florida, Louisiana and Mississippi. Coalition of Concerned Scientists Report.

Paxton was recently impeached by Texas. The congressman, who has been indicted on 20 charges, including bribery and other illegal activities, has received more money from fossil fuel companies than any other sector, according to the bipartisan OpenSecret. Since 2002, fossil fuel giants such as Koch, ExxonMobil and Chevron have put more than $3.9 million into his campaign.

Despite critics, Ragga’s fundraiser has been characterized by attracting corporate donors in affluent neighborhoods, including Sea Island, Georgia, where he held rallies. “Retreat” in Mayand the upcoming one in Pebble Beach, Calif. in August, advertised as the “Victory Fund Golf Retreat.”

Raga has raised $34.5 million in the 2022 election cycle, according to CMD. After news broke in early 2021 about how Lagaa affiliates paid for robocalls, some longtime corporate donors held back for a while. Most then returned to the group.

In Laga, the robocall uproar quickly led to the resignation of executive director Adam Piper, who issued a statement condemning the violence in the parliament building. Mr. Raga tried to downplay other ties to the Trump rally, but Mr. Paxton was a speaker there.

After Trump also left office, Paxton and 10 other attorneys general called on Trump last September to retrieve a large number of classified and other documents improperly kept by Trump as a special counsel. signed a court brief attacking the FBI raid for “looting” the Mar-a-Lago mansion. Jack Smith has been charged with 37 counts against Trump.

The amount of money Lagare spent for the attorney general candidate in the last election reportedly included a pledge to support a candidate who falsely denied or questioned Trump’s defeat to Biden. It contained $9 million. Pro publica.

An inside move that may have strengthened its ties with the Concord Fund, he ran the Rule of Law Defense Fund, which paid for robocalls, and worked for the Federalist Society during the time Leonard Leo was Executive Director. Mr. Peter Bisby was appointed in April. Appointed Executive Director of Raga in 2021

The Concord Fund, formerly known as the Judicial Crisis Network, spent tens of millions of dollars helping three Supreme Court nominees gain congressional approval during the Trump administration. Concord is led by Carrie Severino, a former legal clerk to Judge Clarence Thomas.

Concord, a key group in Leo’s vast dark-finance ecosystem, has donated $4 million to Raga in 2022, roughly 15% of its total funding that year. Leo’s dark money operations have made headlines as he made $1.6 billion in 2022 from Chicago businessman Barre Said. new york times revealed for the first time.

Some former federal prosecutors have expressed concern about the large amount of black money flowing into Laga.

“The combination of politics, slush funds, and the Attorney General will always It’s potentially toxic,” Paul Peltier, former deputy chief of the Justice Department’s fraud division, told The Guardian.

“The normalization of such large black money donations to Raga not only creates the ugly perception that it is an attempt to use the Attorney General’s powers solely for political ends, but it is even worse. In particular, it can encourage corruption.”

Summarize this content to 100 words Since 2020, an influential group of 28 Republican Attorneys General has made huge profits from at least $9.5 million from the Concord Fund, public records have revealed.The Concord Fund was the largest contributor to the Republican Association of Attorneys General (raga) in 2022 and the two years before, and boasts strong ties to Federalist Association co-president Leonard Leo. Leo helped Donald Trump elect three conservative Supreme Court justices and is now spearheading a dark financial network that secured $1.6 billion from one donor.Since its founding in 1999, Raga has raised and spent tens of millions of dollars to help elect Republican Attorneys General, including many that have filed lawsuits in favor of corporations, but the growing role of the underground. has been criticized by watchdog groups and other critics. Funding and special interest industry funding. Many raga members It has fought legal battles against climate change regulations and other business regulations.Other major donors to the 2022 ragga include a division of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, energy giant Coke Industries and tobacco giant Altria, according to the liberal research group Center for Media and Democracy (CMD). are mentioned.Raga members have been criticized as “”.pay play’ is an action to take action to support business interests that help fund a group of Attorneys General, including fossil fuel companies, to oppose climate change regulations. Additionally, amid President Trump’s fight to prevent Joe Biden from taking office, an affiliate, the Rule of Law Defense Fund, sent 150,000 robocalls to increase attendance at President Trump’s Jan. 6 rally. The dollar spent also raised Mr. Raga’s strong concerns. These robocalls urged “patriots” to join rallies and “call on Congress to march to the Capitol and stop stealing.”Ahead of the Trump rally, in late 2020, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, with the backing of 17 Attorneys General Raga, passed an emergency motion to the Supreme Court to overturn Joe Biden’s victories in four states. , but the High Court quickly dismissed this legal strategy.Former Republican Idaho Attorney General Jim Jones told The Guardian that he was disappointed with Paxton’s legal challenge to the 2020 election, calling it “the height of irresponsibility.” They had no facts or laws. “Jones spoke about the raga members and their focus: “They have become political operatives, not state people, to protect the rule of law. “Raga “seems to be focused on the issue of culture wars and the protection of industries such as fossil fuels and tobacco that have a negative impact on the health of Americans,” Jones added.Democratic Senator Sheldon Whitehouse has also emerged as a leading critic of the growing black money backing Lagga and the legal aid many Attorneys General Lagga is giving to fossil fuel companies and other special interest groups. there is”The danger here is that [AG] A firm purportedly set up for the public interest has become a private special interest law firm,” former Rhode Island Attorney General Whitehouse told The Guardian.The White House point was highlighted in 2021 when Mr. Paxton and 19 other state attorneys general filed a lawsuit seeking to block the Environmental Protection Agency from regulating power plants’ carbon emissions. The legal battle culminated in a Supreme Court ruling last year that upheld the EPA’s authority to regulate these emissions under the Clean Air Act, but limited in scope and pleasing the interests of coal companies. rice field.Likewise, many raga members are participating in another growing legal battlefield over fossil fuel interests. Earlier this year, 25 Republican attorneys general, including Mr. Paxton, sued the Labor Department over new rules that would give retirement plan sponsors more room to consider environmental, social and governance issues when investing. A press release from Mr. Paxton’s office in January falsely claimed that labor rules favored Mr. Paxton’s wishes. Called an “awakened” investmentExceed retirement savings.Besides Paxton, some of the most aggressive supporters of Raga’s fossil fuel interests include the attorneys general of South Carolina, Florida, Louisiana and Mississippi. Coalition of Concerned Scientists Report.Paxton was recently impeached by Texas. The congressman, who has been indicted on 20 charges, including bribery and other illegal activities, has received more money from fossil fuel companies than any other sector, according to the bipartisan OpenSecret. Since 2002, fossil fuel giants such as Koch, ExxonMobil and Chevron have put more than $3.9 million into his campaign.Despite critics, Ragga’s fundraiser has been characterized by attracting corporate donors in affluent neighborhoods, including Sea Island, Georgia, where he held rallies. “Retreat” in Mayand the upcoming one in Pebble Beach, Calif. in August, advertised as the “Victory Fund Golf Retreat.”Raga has raised $34.5 million in the 2022 election cycle, according to CMD. After news broke in early 2021 about how Lagaa affiliates paid for robocalls, some longtime corporate donors held back for a while. Most then returned to the group.In Laga, the robocall uproar quickly led to the resignation of executive director Adam Piper, who issued a statement condemning the violence in the parliament building. Mr. Raga tried to downplay other ties to the Trump rally, but Mr. Paxton was a speaker there.After Trump also left office, Paxton and 10 other attorneys general called on Trump last September to retrieve a large number of classified and other documents improperly kept by Trump as a special counsel. signed a court brief attacking the FBI raid for “looting” the Mar-a-Lago mansion. Jack Smith has been charged with 37 counts against Trump.The amount of money Lagare spent for the attorney general candidate in the last election reportedly included a pledge to support a candidate who falsely denied or questioned Trump’s defeat to Biden. It contained $9 million. Pro publica.An inside move that may have strengthened its ties with the Concord Fund, he ran the Rule of Law Defense Fund, which paid for robocalls, and worked for the Federalist Society during the time Leonard Leo was Executive Director. Mr. Peter Bisby was appointed in April. Appointed Executive Director of Raga in 2021The Concord Fund, formerly known as the Judicial Crisis Network, spent tens of millions of dollars helping three Supreme Court nominees gain congressional approval during the Trump administration. Concord is led by Carrie Severino, a former legal clerk to Judge Clarence Thomas.Concord, a key group in Leo’s vast dark-finance ecosystem, has donated $4 million to Raga in 2022, roughly 15% of its total funding that year. Leo’s dark money operations have made headlines as he made $1.6 billion in 2022 from Chicago businessman Barre Said. new york times revealed for the first time.Some former federal prosecutors have expressed concern about the large amount of black money flowing into Laga.“The combination of politics, slush funds, and the Attorney General will always It’s potentially toxic,” Paul Peltier, former deputy chief of the Justice Department’s fraud division, told The Guardian.”The normalization of such large black money donations to Raga not only creates the ugly perception that it is an attempt to use the Attorney General’s powers solely for political ends, but it is even worse. In particular, it can encourage corruption.”
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2023/jun/23/concord-fund-republican-attorneys-general U.S. Black Money Fund Spends Millions To Support Republican Attorney General | Republican Party

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